The Lake St.Clair Network: Bob the Boat Seat Guy - The Lake St.Clair Network

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Bob the Boat Seat Guy a review

#1 User is offline   sleeper 

  • LSCN Groupie
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 3,638
  • Joined: 24-February 04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St Clair Shores
  • Home Port: St. Clair Shores
  • Boat Type:Yamaha GPR, Kawasaki 650SX

Posted 21 June 2010 - 08:42 AM

I had the sun pad for my boat done by Bob the Boat Seat Guy. Thought i'd share my experience.

I'm kind of a perfectionist. I'll preface this review with that - I don't accept substandard work.

I had Bob's company redo 3 flat pieces for the sun pad of my fountain. These are actually pretty complex pieces, the front piece has a lot of small parts that have to be stitched together properly to fit right. The other two pieces have some stripes that have to line up properly to look good. There were two colors used in the work. I built all the wood parts, and the foam was reused.

Bob is a big guy, apparently sedentary. He runs his business out of his home, and he has employees doing all the work in the basement and garage. The employees were mostly polite and professional, but some seemed brighter than others. When talking to his main helper, I was never 100% confident that what I was saying would be accurately understood by the person actually doing the work. Other employees seemed to be a bit sharper, but I don't think communication was always all that great.

In the end, the seats look pretty good. I still have a couple of minor complaints, but for the price, I'm fairly well satisfied at this point. However, it took a little while to get to this point. You get what you pay for, and Bob is the cheapest around. I got quotes of $1200 from Andre and Naum, $1500 from another guy, and Bob did it for $675. Given the price, the work is decent.

However, it took them 3 tries, and I did some of it myself. The first time I picked it up, all 3 pieces were stretched too tight, leaving gaps between them. The front piece has headrests that are supposed to extend forward over the top of the back bench and sit flush with the bench. This was stretched far too tight and did not fit right at all. The middle piece has a graphic that looks like an arrow. It was put on backwards, despite the board being marked as to which direction was forward.

I returned it with those complaints, and picked it up again in a week. They had turned around the middle piece, and claimed to have loosened up the other two pieces. I bit my tongue and took the pieces home, where I had to loosen up the front piece myself. I could tell that it had not been disassembled, Bob's employees had either lied to me, or more likely there was a miscommunication along the line. Once I got it loosened up almost where it was supposed to be, I noticed a few other problems. The middle piece was still too tight - I took it apart and added a little foam on 3 sides to make it line up with the back piece on the sides and to put the graphic back on top instead of stretching down into the seam where it was. This also closed the gap between the 3 pieces.

Once I got all the pieces reinstalled, the graphics on the rear two pieces did not align with each other as they were supposed to. One of the stripes on the front piece was the wrong color (a very slightly different shade of blue - not apparent at first, but they obviously mistakenly grabbed the wrong piece of vinyl when they cut that piece). Another of the stripes was crooked - visibly to the naked eye, and measurably with a tape measure. There were also a couple of pieces that were stitched wrong and not even, and there were some wrinkles apparent where the pieces weren't stretched evenly as they were stitched together. There was also a problem with the stitching on the middle piece, it was not finished and tied off properly at the end and it had started to come unstitched already, due in part to my having to disassemble the piece to make it fit properly.


When I returned the pieces the second time, there were 3 of his employees present. Bob was sitting on the bed in his room / office, as he was every time I was there. He was not able to get up to view the problems, and relied on his employees. There was the employee I had dealt with previously, another guy I had not yet met, and an older lady that apparently did some of the stitching and cutting. She claimed to have already taken these apart too many times and was indignant and refused to acknowledge the problems at first. As I pointed each problem out she claimed not to see it. The other employee that I had not met piped up every time, thankfully, as he obviously saw the problems. She eventually relented and agreed to fix the problems.

When I picked the pieces up for the last time the stripes and stitching on the front piece were fixed and looked good. However, it was again stretched very tight. Another employee whom I had not met yet fixed this for me on the spot. I helped him with it, and we got it stretched just how it needs to be, or rather, as close as it's going to get. This piece looks good now. The rear piece had also been redone, as they found that they had cut one of the stripes too wide and that's why it wasn't lining up with the middle piece properly. They had not disassembled the middle piece, as they did not need to to fix the stripes, and thus they had not fixed the problem with the stitching.

I pointed out the problem with the stitching again, and they initially agreed to fix it. However, before I left, Bob said he wouldn't be doing any more work on this piece and that I should just take it. I didn't argue... this is a relatively simple fix and I will likely repair it myself if it becomes any worse. Sometimes, if you want something done right...

Overall, I'd give them a C-. In the end, the parts came out pretty well, for half the cost of his competitors. Bob's refusal to fix the stitching the last time is the only thing that has me really debating whether or not to go back to him. I would like to use him again so that I can ensure the colors match, but I will do a couple of things differently.

If you use Bob, I would recommend sticking to one color. This will eliminate issues with stripes or graphics not lining up properly. If there is a complex piece, I would recommend simplifying it somewhat and minimizing seams. This is a good idea anyway, as the seams are usually the first parts to fail. This will also save you some money as it saves labor and material. I saw some solid color work they had done, and it all looked pretty good. Part of my problem was the complexity of the parts.
0

#2 User is offline   K G 

  • LSCN Groupie
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 3,366
  • Joined: 05-May 04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St. Clair Shores
  • Home Port: St. Clair Shores
  • Boat Type:280 Sea Ray

Posted 13 July 2010 - 07:03 AM

Do you have a contact number?

Thanks

Ken
0

#3 User is offline   Big Dog 

  • LSCN Sponsor since 0410
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: LSCN Sponsor
  • Posts: 28,072
  • Joined: 10-June 06
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Eastpointe
  • Boat Type:1994 Starcraft

Posted 13 July 2010 - 07:59 AM

http://www.lakestclair.net/network/Bob---T...t-Seat-Guy.html
Big Dog


Just My Style Embroidery
justmystyleembroidery@gmail.com





My link
0

#4 User is offline   NoShow 

  • LSCN Fan
  • PipPipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1,495
  • Joined: 18-April 06
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Roseville
  • Home Port: Hideaway 88
  • Boat Type:1996 WellCraft 2650 Martinique
  • Boat Name: Broke Again...

Posted 13 July 2010 - 08:07 AM

He has done 2 of my seats so far, and by far the best price, and since mine are solid white with no alignment to other pieces i feel they look and fit fine... As long as the stitching and material holds up I currently have no complaints...
0

#5 User is offline   zeezer 

  • Testing the waters
  • Pip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 71
  • Joined: 25-April 07
  • Location:Macomb/Algonac
  • Home Port: Algonac
  • Boat Type:28 maxum
  • Boat Name: All About Me!

Posted 13 July 2010 - 09:12 AM

I would like to add my 2 cents if I may. I too do boat canvas & interiors out of my house. I have been doing it for over 20 years. My father sewd seats for Ford for many years, & we always had an industrial machine at the house, so I had a great teacher. I have also worked for 3 automotive seating suppliers in the last few years, so I know how it works from the inside out.

1) You are the customer & have the right to a good job at a fair price! Period!
2) You are paying for talent, not production! If anyone could do it everyone would. You are paying for a high performance piece of furniture, not a BBQ cover.
3) By your description, your job sounded like more work than a typical rear cover. That price sounded a bit low for the amount of work performed.
4) you will almost always have problems with fit if you do not use a good quality foam. The old foam has been baked in the sun & does not have the same properties as it did when the factory fabricated it. The corners were most likely crushed from the old vinyl which is why eveything else had to be pulled tighter.
5) Most factory vinyls are incredibly cheap & thin which makes it easier to pull over a cheaper foam. Even if he used a lower end vinyl, it's probably better then the stuff that the factory used, unless it is a really high end boat.
6) as a fabricator I only get one chance to pattern a job correctly. The factory got to make 3-4 sets of patterns & sewd them for fit & evaluation before a master set of templates is created.
7) The thread is seperating because the seat covers are made oversize, pulled over the seat frames, stapled, & trimmed. If the stitching was back-tacked, it was most likely removed when trimmed. The staples are holding the stitching together. If you keep adjusting the covers the stitching will continue to seperate. You really need to pull them off & reinforce the stitching at the ends!!!
8) As an owner, Bob has an obligation to stand behind his work, even if someone is doing it for him. You're paying him not an employee.
9) As an owner, Bob has an obligation to inform the customer that it will never look perfect like the factory. see #6 He can only do his best & demonstrate examples of his past work.
10) As a customer you have an obligation to inform the fabricator what your expectations are. Many people think we're mind readers. You may not like what the last customer loved! Make sure your intentions are spelled out on paper. You should have gotten a statement of work before anything is touched.
11) I turn down jobs for a host of reasons, but if a customer says he's a perfectionist, & won't pay for the talent that I can provide, I won't do it!
11) YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR! Some can do it for less than the next guy, but there is usually a reason. It is Very difficult to have the lowest price when you pay employees!
I don't so I can provide a better price usually.


I don't want it to sound like I'm defending Bob the boat seat guy, but wanted to give a little insight as to why things happen the way they do. Being on the fabrication side, I know what it takes to do a quality job. I am also a customer & have expectations too!

Hope this helps
Nick
0

#6 User is offline   sleeper 

  • LSCN Groupie
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 3,638
  • Joined: 24-February 04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St Clair Shores
  • Home Port: St. Clair Shores
  • Boat Type:Yamaha GPR, Kawasaki 650SX

Posted 13 July 2010 - 10:08 AM

QUOTE
4) you will almost always have problems with fit if you do not use a good quality foam. The old foam has been baked in the sun & does not have the same properties as it did when the factory fabricated it. The corners were most likely crushed from the old vinyl which is why eveything else had to be pulled tighter.
5) Most factory vinyls are incredibly cheap & thin which makes it easier to pull over a cheaper foam. Even if he used a lower end vinyl, it's probably better then the stuff that the factory used, unless it is a really high end boat.


The foam was 90% fine. I had the seats apart several times fixing torn seams before finally having them redone. Some of the foam in the forward piece was bad, but we're talking 2x 2" wide pieces between the headrests. The last time they did it they replaced those small pieces of foam. There was no crushing at the corners on any of the foam - the sun pad is recessed on the back deck so weight doesn't get put on the corners. Once the front piece was un-stretched, it fit fine and is plenty tight. They wanted to bounce a quarter off of it, and it just wasn't designed for that, as the foam allows the head rests to hang a good 3-4" in front of the edge of the wood - pull it too tight, and it'll come out like crap, new foam or no. Also - if they get into the pieces and find the foam is too rough to re-use, it's their responsibility to call me and tell me - not to wait until the job is done and blame a substandard job on the old foam.

The vinyl is definitely lower quality than OEM. It's a Fountain, so it's a pretty high-end boat... the OEM vinyl is pretty good quality. Most of it is still holding up 20 years later.

The new sun pad looks good, though. I knew i'd be getting what I was paying for, and I simplified the design somewhat before taking it in. I definitely communicated exactly what I wanted done to Bob and his #1 in command. By the time it got down the the fabricator, design intent was lost. They had no idea that the stripes on 2 of the pieces were supposed to line up. Also, the middle piece was clearly marked for "forward", and they assembled it backwards. No biggie, but there's not much excuse for that other than "whoops, I messed up."
0

#7 User is offline   Big Dog 

  • LSCN Sponsor since 0410
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: LSCN Sponsor
  • Posts: 28,072
  • Joined: 10-June 06
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Eastpointe
  • Boat Type:1994 Starcraft

Posted 13 July 2010 - 10:26 AM

Good post Nick!
"11) YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR! Some can do it for less than the next guy, but there is usually a reason."

Materials are a good portion of the job, if you start with poor quality materials, you're going to end up with a poor quality product, no matter how good the workmanship is.
The best fabricator or designer or seamstress can do a great job, but if the quality of the materials used is sub-standard the finished product will never look as good and hold up as well as it would if quality materials were used to start with.

A good fabricator/designer/seamstress will do the best possible job and will always go that extra mile to do a professional job. If that means you have to explain the hows and whys of a job to a customer, you do it, to make sure they are satisfied.
It's always easier to do the job right the first time.
Big Dog


Just My Style Embroidery
justmystyleembroidery@gmail.com





My link
0

#8 User is offline   canaller 

  • LSCN Fan
  • PipPipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1,944
  • Joined: 05-January 09
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Marine City
  • Home Port: Algonac Harbour Club, Driveway, Boathouse
  • Boat Type:Chris Craft 281, Starcraft 18', Gamefisher 14'
  • Boat Name: Leucothea, New Adventure

Posted 13 July 2010 - 11:22 AM

QUOTE(zeezer @ Jul 13 2010, 09:12 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I would like to add my 2 cents if I may. I too do boat canvas & interiors out of my house. I have been doing it for over 20 years. My father sewd seats for Ford for many years, & we always had an industrial machine at the house, so I had a great teacher. I have also worked for 3 automotive seating suppliers in the last few years, so I know how it works from the inside out.

1) You are the customer & have the right to a good job at a fair price! Period!
2) You are paying for talent, not production! If anyone could do it everyone would. You are paying for a high performance piece of furniture, not a BBQ cover.
3) By your description, your job sounded like more work than a typical rear cover. That price sounded a bit low for the amount of work performed.
4) you will almost always have problems with fit if you do not use a good quality foam. The old foam has been baked in the sun & does not have the same properties as it did when the factory fabricated it. The corners were most likely crushed from the old vinyl which is why eveything else had to be pulled tighter.
5) Most factory vinyls are incredibly cheap & thin which makes it easier to pull over a cheaper foam. Even if he used a lower end vinyl, it's probably better then the stuff that the factory used, unless it is a really high end boat.
6) as a fabricator I only get one chance to pattern a job correctly. The factory got to make 3-4 sets of patterns & sewd them for fit & evaluation before a master set of templates is created.
7) The thread is seperating because the seat covers are made oversize, pulled over the seat frames, stapled, & trimmed. If the stitching was back-tacked, it was most likely removed when trimmed. The staples are holding the stitching together. If you keep adjusting the covers the stitching will continue to seperate. You really need to pull them off & reinforce the stitching at the ends!!!
8) As an owner, Bob has an obligation to stand behind his work, even if someone is doing it for him. You're paying him not an employee.
9) As an owner, Bob has an obligation to inform the customer that it will never look perfect like the factory. see #6 He can only do his best & demonstrate examples of his past work.
10) As a customer you have an obligation to inform the fabricator what your expectations are. Many people think we're mind readers. You may not like what the last customer loved! Make sure your intentions are spelled out on paper. You should have gotten a statement of work before anything is touched.
11) I turn down jobs for a host of reasons, but if a customer says he's a perfectionist, & won't pay for the talent that I can provide, I won't do it!
11) YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR! Some can do it for less than the next guy, but there is usually a reason. It is Very difficult to have the lowest price when you pay employees!
I don't so I can provide a better price usually.


I don't want it to sound like I'm defending Bob the boat seat guy, but wanted to give a little insight as to why things happen the way they do. Being on the fabrication side, I know what it takes to do a quality job. I am also a customer & have expectations too!

Hope this helps
Nick


Hi Nick,
Ready for next weekend?
Mark and the little Canadian
0

#9 User is offline   zeezer 

  • Testing the waters
  • Pip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 71
  • Joined: 25-April 07
  • Location:Macomb/Algonac
  • Home Port: Algonac
  • Boat Type:28 maxum
  • Boat Name: All About Me!

Posted 13 July 2010 - 11:22 AM

Thx Laura,

Sleeper is the customer & shouldn't have to fix the job if he's not satisfied. The shop should make it right for him.
If possible I give the customer 3 material options. Good, better, best. I show them exactly what they're paying for & what the difference is. I also provide options for construction or project simplification as Sleeper said. I try to give the customer the best price for what they ask for. I then provide options to them for additional cost. I agree with Sleeper though, If the foam needed to be replaced or improved, the customer should be informed & given a revised price for the additional work & material. I also don't think Bob should have accepted a job such as sleeper's for that price!!! He should have questioned why it was 1/2 the price of similar fabricators! A low ball price like that only gives the fabricator an excuse to say "sorry you got a cheap price, what do you expect?"

I don't promise the world & then come back & say I can't do it when you wanted it or for that price just to get the job.
0

#10 User is online   Capt'n Rob 

  • LSCN Captain
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Admin
  • Posts: 7,442
  • Joined: 17-May 00
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Harrison Township
  • Home Port: Harrison Township

Posted 13 July 2010 - 11:35 AM

QUOTE(zeezer @ Jul 13 2010, 10:12 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I would like to add my 2 cents if I may. I too do boat canvas & interiors out of my house. I have been doing it for over 20 years. My father sewd seats for Ford for many years, & we always had an industrial machine at the house, so I had a great teacher. I have also worked for 3 automotive seating suppliers in the last few years, so I know how it works from the inside out.

1) You are the customer & have the right to a good job at a fair price! Period!
2) You are paying for talent, not production! If anyone could do it everyone would. You are paying for a high performance piece of furniture, not a BBQ cover.
3) By your description, your job sounded like more work than a typical rear cover. That price sounded a bit low for the amount of work performed.
4) you will almost always have problems with fit if you do not use a good quality foam. The old foam has been baked in the sun & does not have the same properties as it did when the factory fabricated it. The corners were most likely crushed from the old vinyl which is why eveything else had to be pulled tighter.
5) Most factory vinyls are incredibly cheap & thin which makes it easier to pull over a cheaper foam. Even if he used a lower end vinyl, it's probably better then the stuff that the factory used, unless it is a really high end boat.
6) as a fabricator I only get one chance to pattern a job correctly. The factory got to make 3-4 sets of patterns & sewd them for fit & evaluation before a master set of templates is created.
7) The thread is seperating because the seat covers are made oversize, pulled over the seat frames, stapled, & trimmed. If the stitching was back-tacked, it was most likely removed when trimmed. The staples are holding the stitching together. If you keep adjusting the covers the stitching will continue to seperate. You really need to pull them off & reinforce the stitching at the ends!!!
8) As an owner, Bob has an obligation to stand behind his work, even if someone is doing it for him. You're paying him not an employee.
9) As an owner, Bob has an obligation to inform the customer that it will never look perfect like the factory. see #6 He can only do his best & demonstrate examples of his past work.
10) As a customer you have an obligation to inform the fabricator what your expectations are. Many people think we're mind readers. You may not like what the last customer loved! Make sure your intentions are spelled out on paper. You should have gotten a statement of work before anything is touched.
11) I turn down jobs for a host of reasons, but if a customer says he's a perfectionist, & won't pay for the talent that I can provide, I won't do it!
11) YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR! Some can do it for less than the next guy, but there is usually a reason. It is Very difficult to have the lowest price when you pay employees!
I don't so I can provide a better price usually.


I don't want it to sound like I'm defending Bob the boat seat guy, but wanted to give a little insight as to why things happen the way they do. Being on the fabrication side, I know what it takes to do a quality job. I am also a customer & have expectations too!

Hope this helps
Nick



Nick, good respectable post. If you want to jump on as a LSCN sponsor, we would love to have you. Sounds like you have some solid experience. Request an Ad Quote

Save our South Channel Lights (SOSCL)
Nautical Mile Merchants Association (NMMA)
Michigan Boating Industries Association (MBIA)
Central Macomb Chamber of Commerce (CMCC)
Boat Town USA
Anchor Bay Chamber (ABCC)

The Lake St. Clair Network is brought to you by Advanced Media Solutions
0

#11 User is offline   zeezer 

  • Testing the waters
  • Pip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 71
  • Joined: 25-April 07
  • Location:Macomb/Algonac
  • Home Port: Algonac
  • Boat Type:28 maxum
  • Boat Name: All About Me!

Posted 13 July 2010 - 02:19 PM

QUOTE(Capt'n Rob @ Jul 13 2010, 12:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE(zeezer @ Jul 13 2010, 10:12 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I would like to add my 2 cents if I may. I too do boat canvas & interiors out of my house. I have been doing it for over 20 years. My father sewd seats for Ford for many years, & we always had an industrial machine at the house, so I had a great teacher. I have also worked for 3 automotive seating suppliers in the last few years, so I know how it works from the inside out.

1) You are the customer & have the right to a good job at a fair price! Period!
2) You are paying for talent, not production! If anyone could do it everyone would. You are paying for a high performance piece of furniture, not a BBQ cover.
3) By your description, your job sounded like more work than a typical rear cover. That price sounded a bit low for the amount of work performed.
4) you will almost always have problems with fit if you do not use a good quality foam. The old foam has been baked in the sun & does not have the same properties as it did when the factory fabricated it. The corners were most likely crushed from the old vinyl which is why eveything else had to be pulled tighter.
5) Most factory vinyls are incredibly cheap & thin which makes it easier to pull over a cheaper foam. Even if he used a lower end vinyl, it's probably better then the stuff that the factory used, unless it is a really high end boat.
6) as a fabricator I only get one chance to pattern a job correctly. The factory got to make 3-4 sets of patterns & sewd them for fit & evaluation before a master set of templates is created.
7) The thread is seperating because the seat covers are made oversize, pulled over the seat frames, stapled, & trimmed. If the stitching was back-tacked, it was most likely removed when trimmed. The staples are holding the stitching together. If you keep adjusting the covers the stitching will continue to seperate. You really need to pull them off & reinforce the stitching at the ends!!!
8) As an owner, Bob has an obligation to stand behind his work, even if someone is doing it for him. You're paying him not an employee.
9) As an owner, Bob has an obligation to inform the customer that it will never look perfect like the factory. see #6 He can only do his best & demonstrate examples of his past work.
10) As a customer you have an obligation to inform the fabricator what your expectations are. Many people think we're mind readers. You may not like what the last customer loved! Make sure your intentions are spelled out on paper. You should have gotten a statement of work before anything is touched.
11) I turn down jobs for a host of reasons, but if a customer says he's a perfectionist, & won't pay for the talent that I can provide, I won't do it!
11) YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR! Some can do it for less than the next guy, but there is usually a reason. It is Very difficult to have the lowest price when you pay employees!
I don't so I can provide a better price usually.


I don't want it to sound like I'm defending Bob the boat seat guy, but wanted to give a little insight as to why things happen the way they do. Being on the fabrication side, I know what it takes to do a quality job. I am also a customer & have expectations too!

Hope this helps
Nick



Nick, good respectable post. If you want to jump on as a LSCN sponsor, we would love to have you. Sounds like you have some solid experience. Request an Ad Quote



Cap'n

I'd be happy to have you quote a sponsorship. I'd like to wait until fall though. I hate to advertize If I cannot get the work done for the visitors on this site. I typically do repairs or one & 2 day jobs during the week during season. I work full time & do not sew on the weekends when the boat is in the water. I was not trying to advertise via post, just wanted to provide some additional info for the folks on the board. Please pm me with some pricing though. biggrin.gif

Thx
Nick
0

#12 User is offline   Waldawg 

  • LSCN Pirate
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 948
  • Joined: 31-January 06
  • Gender:Male
  • Boat Type:23' Capri Classic
  • Boat Name: Island Wally

Posted 13 July 2010 - 02:37 PM

Nick made me a new cockpit cover for me this past spring and did a fantastic job!!! Very happy with his work and priceing!!!
0

#13 User is offline   Dos mangos 

  • LSCN Groupie
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 2,544
  • Joined: 29-September 06
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ann Arbor

Posted 13 July 2010 - 05:37 PM

I have seen Nicks work and its great , and priced fairly, and great post Nick
0

Share this topic:


Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users


The Lake St. Clair Network is a local social network for Lake St.Clair and surrounding waterways such as Detroit River, Clinton River, Lake Erie, Lake Huron and Lake Michigan.
We are the #1 source for Lake St.Clair Fishing Reports, Ice Fishing, Lake St. Clair News, Lake St.Clair Boating, Michigan Fishing and Michigan Hunting.