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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am starting to see small patches of crab grass from my neighbors yard creeping over to mine and would like to do all I can to stop it.

Any products that are recomended before I buy the wrong stuff?

Any home remedies that may work?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
With what? Any product that works well that you'd reccomend?

The issue is I am the 2nd house from a corner and he is on the corner. Our lawns ajoin. I do fertilize most of his as i normally do to try and help the situation with out being too intrusive. But unfortunately he is just letting it go. I have tried to communicate with him my concerns, and its just not sinking in. So in a few weeks I am going to build a nice berm to come from our landscape bed down almost to the walk. I am hoping this will help the situation. He is a great guy, just doesnt care to take care of his property the way I do, no biggie, I just want to somehow work around it in an amicable manner!
 

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Assuming you are correct that it's crabgrass, here's my suggestion.

The crabgrass will die off and disappear as we end the mowing season. Unfortunately, this doesn't happen before it drops the seeds for next year. The only way to control the crabgrass is to put down a pre-emergent in the spring. (like Scotts Turfbuilder with Haltz crabgrass control). The preemergent prevents the crabgrass seeds from germinating. Once the plants have started, they are next to impossible to get rid of.

I have had issues with crabgrass in my own lawn and if you apply the Turfbuilder with Halts at the right time (as soon as soil temps reach 50 degrees in spring), you will lay down a barrier that will prevent the seeds from germinating and you will have a crabgrass free lawn.
 

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QUOTE(Ranman @ Sep 16 2009, 10:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Assuming you are correct that it's crabgrass, here's my suggestion.

The crabgrass will die off and disappear as we end the mowing season. Unfortunately, this doesn't happen before it drops the seeds for next year. The only way to control the crabgrass is to put down a pre-emergent in the spring. (like Scotts Turfbuilder with Haltz crabgrass control). The preemergent prevents the crabgrass seeds from germinating. Once the plants have started, they are next to impossible to get rid of.

I have had issues with crabgrass in my own lawn and if you apply the Turfbuilder with Halts at the right time (as soon as soil temps reach 50 degrees in spring), you will lay down a barrier that will prevent the seeds from germinating and you will have a crabgrass free lawn.

x2 and you typed my post for me.
 

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I'm working on becoming a lawn freak.
So that product gets put down in spring? They do offer a Scotts Halts (link) without the turfbuilder product that says year round. Is this no good?

Also I'm working on all the up/downs/bumps in my lawn. Thinking about renting a large roller. Should I? What time frame? I've heard in the spring and fall it's fine.

I was throwing around the idea of getting my lawn/soil tested at the MSU Soil and Plant Nutrient Laboratory. Has anyone done this? http://www.css.msu.edu/SPNL/
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Rerun-good questions.

I am trying to prevent myself from becoming the obsessive idiot I can become over this lawn!

I have a large roller I used on my back yard after I plased top soil and sod down. Worked good. I believe it is a 50 gallon roller???

My front lawn is old school st clair shores, mostly clay! I have the same "bumps you are refering too. In the sping I plan to bring in more top soil and level it out to staret over with the lawn. But before I start I want to make sure that the neighbors weeds are isolated from my lawn. There fore the reason for a berm and a "speration" of lawns.

But before this is done I have to finished my 6" perforated pipe from the rear yard to the curb with out the City catching me! LOL
 

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QUOTE(rerun @ Sep 16 2009, 02:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'm working on becoming a lawn freak.
So that product gets put down in spring? They do offer a Scotts Halts (link) without the turfbuilder product that says year round. Is this no good?

Also I'm working on all the up/downs/bumps in my lawn. Thinking about renting a large roller. Should I? What time frame? I've heard in the spring and fall it's fine.

I was throwing around the idea of getting my lawn/soil tested at the MSU Soil and Plant Nutrient Laboratory. Has anyone done this? http://www.css.msu.edu/SPNL/

Yes. Spring is the only practical time to use it with the slight exception of a possible reapplication in early summer to maintain your "barrier" protection. The pre-emergent only works on seeds and prevents them from germinating into crabgrass plants. The seeds germinate only one time during the year and that'about XX days (15 to 30 I think) after soil temps reach 50 degrees consistently. Applying the haltz barrier before germination, stops the seeds from sprouting. Applying after is pointless and you might as well wait for the crabgrass to drop its seeds and die off in the fall. The reason it's mixed with Turfbuilder is because mose people want to feed their lawn in early spring as well so you can hit two birds with one stone. I wouldn't bother with the HAltz only unless I already fertilized and forgot to use Haltz. Scotts won't tell you "don't buy me", but there's only one time of year it's effective.

The rollers are fineassuming your soil is not already too compacted. I like spring better than fall because the lawn will get lumpy over the winter.

I've thought about the MSU thing too, but havent done it. I would start by checking your thatch layer to ensure it's only 1" or less. If no thatch, be sure to use a mulching mower with a sharp blade at the highest setting and only take off 1/3 of the grass blade per cut max (should be doing this anyway). Get some fertilizer and follow a schedule. We could talk fertilizer for hours, but I like to use the Scotts program and I throw in a straight 10-10-10 fertilizer every now and then.

Last thing about soil quality. Dig up a corner somewhere and look for earthworms. The more the better. It's not uncommon for there to be 1,000,000 worms per acre of decent soil. If you see lots of worms (good natural aerators), your soil quality and Ph is pretty good. Do some reading on worms and you'll see what I'm talking about. Good luck.
 

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For the $12 MSU charges I figured why not.

Currently I'm not mulching my lawn. I bag the grass as I think it gives it a much cleaner look. Do you think this is a bad move long term? Of course I've got my mower on the highest height setting.

Ken you own the roller?
 

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QUOTE(rerun @ Sep 16 2009, 03:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>For the $12 MSU charges I figured why not.

Currently I'm not mulching my lawn. I bag the grass as I think it gives it a much cleaner look. Do you think this is a bad move long term? Of course I've got my mower on the highest height setting.

Ken you own the roller?

Paragraph clipped from somewhere else:

In general, mulching your lawn is a good idea because it helps provide the soil with increased ground cover to hold moisture, and acts as a fertilizer. Clippings can contain up to 80% water and 5% nitrogen that can continuously fertilize your lawn! Additionally, mulching can reduce the amount of fertilizer you need to apply to your lawn. Mulching also reduces the headache of bagging your lawn and disposing of cut clippings. Again, the common side effect to mulching is development of Thatch in your lawn. As a rule of thumb, mulching is recommended during times of seasonal droughts, heat waves, and after fertilization and lawn development. Conversely, it is recommended that you try to bag your clippings occasionally, especially when you witness either a build-up of clippings on the lawn surface or an excess development of thatch in the lawn.

With the increasing use of mulching mowers, people often wonder if and when to mulch their clippings. Mulching mowers discharge grass differently than conventional side-discharge mowers by using a special mulching blade that returns the grass clippings to the lawn through a continuous cut and re-cut motion. This process eventually drops the finely cut clippings back into the lawn. Notice we didn't say onto the lawn. Many people who don't follow the 1/3 mowing rule, mow to quickly, or lack sufficient horsepower provided by the mower will often times leave large clumps of grass on the lawn. These clippings are not sufficiently mulched to the point where they drop into the lawn.
 

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QUOTE(Ranman @ Sep 16 2009, 09:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Assuming you are correct that it's crabgrass, here's my suggestion.

The crabgrass will die off and disappear as we end the mowing season. Unfortunately, this doesn't happen before it drops the seeds for next year. The only way to control the crabgrass is to put down a pre-emergent in the spring. (like Scotts Turfbuilder with Haltz crabgrass control). The preemergent prevents the crabgrass seeds from germinating. Once the plants have started, they are next to impossible to get rid of.

I have had issues with crabgrass in my own lawn and if you apply the Turfbuilder with Halts at the right time (as soon as soil temps reach 50 degrees in spring), you will lay down a barrier that will prevent the seeds from germinating and you will have a crabgrass free lawn.

So is it time to put it down or is it to late?
 

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QUOTE(Big Dog @ Apr 6 2010, 07:57 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I've heard the old adage that the crab grass preventer should be put down when the forsythia are in bloom.
My neighbors forsythia is bright yellow, do it now.

That's what I've always heard too. They recently started saying tax day because the ground may not be warm enough, even though the air temp is. My neighbors says to wait for the weeds coming up in sidewalk cracks and next to the driveway. Because the concerete absorbs heat, these areas will be a little warmer and the weeds start first there. The rest of the soil will soon be that temp too, so it's time to get the pre-emergent down.
 

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I just aerated my whole yard and layed new seed. I want to put down a crab grass killer, but will have to wait about 4 weeks to do that as this will keep my greass seed from growing. I am hoping to have a nice yard this year.

I went to Washington Elevator for my seed and will go back there for the fertilizer as well. I have heard good things about their products and they are wayyyyy cheaper than Scott's products.
 

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I guess the whole green thumb gene skipped my generation?
Grandmother used to run her own nursery, Mother can get anything to grow, but I'm just a boater.
Summer lawn care consists of driving across the front lawn on a regular basis, to pack the grass down so I don't have to mow it as often.
No fertilizer, no extra water, not nearly as much work
 
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