Lake St. Clair Fishing Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,536 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious if there were any muzzleloaders out there?

If so...

Traditional or modern? What type, caliber etc?

I haven't bought one yet...I'm torn between modern and traditional.

Modern offers so many fail-safe benefits, traditional just is what it is. Traditional! Too cool
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,550 Posts
Good topic Gary. Back home they're real big. I used to live down the street from Thompson Center Arms, and have owned several of their models. Currently, I got a 0.54 cal Renegade. Traditional firing set up, with 26" bull barrel, with a beautiful black walnut stock.

The new modern types are easier to load, lighter, safer, and maintain/clean. Some say more reliable, though I'd never had a problem with mine that I could attribute to the gun -- mostly wet caps on the rare occasion of a misfire. Personally, I'll never consider a modern day muzzle loader. There's a certain appeal about the traditional setup that makes muzzle loading enjoyable -- a connection to the past that I enjoy.

I've never had a flint lock, never fired one, but I know a couple of oldtimers' back home that swear by them. It would be interesting to own and learn how to use one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
I own both a traditional 50 caliber carbine with open sights that uses a patched round ball and a percussion cap and a stainless steel 54 caliber synthetic stock scoped in-line that uses 209 shotgun primer. I have found that although my in-line is more accurate and easier to clean and by all accounts better I still take my old 50 cal in the field during "front stuffer" season. It is my opinion that the "coal burner" season should take me back in time. I have taken several deer during the muzzle loading season with my old 50 cal and I have found those hunts to be some of the most memorable. I have been shooting muzzle loaders for over 20 years and if you decide to go traditional there are many tips I have learned over the years that I would be happy to share with you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
I actually use my Muzzle Loader throughout the whole season. Except when I am up North in the Rifle zone. I use an inline Thompson Center Thunderhawk. Very reliable and very acurate. I would highly reccommend it to anyone else!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
I actually use my Muzzle Loader throughout the whole season. Except when I am up North in the Rifle zone. I use a .54 caliber inline Thompson Center Thunderhawk. Very reliable and very acurate. I would highly reccommend it to anyone else!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,550 Posts
QUOTE(Scubajay @ Nov 30 2003, 11:49 AM)I have found that although my in-line is more accurate and easier to clean and by all accounts better I still take my old 50 cal in the field during "front stuffer" season.

How much more accurate? Is it the scope?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
I can group about 2 inches at 100 yards with my scoped in-line using a sabot whereas the best I can get with my open sight patched round ball 50 cal is about 7-8 inches at 100 yards (my old eyes can barely see the target at that distance without a scope). I rarely take a shot at a deer over 50 yards and most are less than 30 yards because I prefer to still-hunt in the thick stuff where the big guys like to hide. I am using a Burris Black Diamond 6X-50mm on my in-line, which has proven to be a very good scope and has made my in-line very accurate. I shoot the in-line a great deal for fun at the range but for business the 50 cal gets to go with me in the woods.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,536 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
All good information...I didn't realize that traditional is that complicated.

But it is what it is...traditional!!

I think i would get both. One for serious hunts(modern), a traditional for shooting and for those days when you just wanna hunt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
Here are a few things that I have learned along the way.

1. A cleaning solution of equal parts Murphy's Oil Soap, hydrogen peroxide and 90%+ isopropyl alcohol works great for cleaning both black powder or substitutes (like Pyrodex). It contains no petroleum based oil and allows for the barrel to become "seasoned" much like that of an iron skillet. Petroleum based oils will dissolve the "seasoning" and makes loading you gun more difficult. Over time this will increase performance and accuracy and ease of use.
2. If you are going to shoot patched round ball the use of Thompson Center Bore Butter (or similar product from other manufactures) is essential. It allows for all-day shooting without fouling the barrel which eliminates the need to clean the barrel frequently. This product is also petroleum free. I like to put a portion into a coffee cup and melt it in the microwave then introduce a bunch of patches into the liquefied Bore Butter until they soak it all up. I then place them in a plastic storage bag from which I can remove one at a time as I am shooting.
3. For storage of all guns including muzzle loaders the use of Ballistol is essential in my opinion. Ballistol contains a combination of antioxidants and non petroleum based medical oils, which make it much less susceptible to the process of aging. It is biodegradable. Neither its use nor disposal will pollute our precious air or water. If you have not used Ballistol in the past you will be amazed at how well it works.
4. Cleaning muzzle loaders takes a bit longer and is more difficult but they should be cleaned immediately after use. This will help keep your gun accurate and safe for a very long time.

These are a few of the things that I have learned along the way and have worked well for me. I hope you find some of it useful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,174 Posts
I have a Knight, in-line, .50 cal., all black & plastic stock.
It has a Bushnell 3x9 scope on it.
I won it in a raffle about three years ago. I can't remember if it was RGS or PF.
I don't use it mch, I'm not a cold weather hunter.

I was thinking about converting to use 209 shotshell primers. Anyone out there done this? Was it hard? Notice better perforance or better grouping?
Just wondering.

NoCode
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,536 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Dumb question...

Can you shoot shot through a BP gun? Ya know like a shot gun. Thinking maybe doing this for the upcoming Spring turkey hunt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
The short answer is yes. However, there are a few things to consider. You will not be able to load as much shot as a standard 3 inch 12 gauge turkey load (1-2 ounces). The velocity of the shot at muzzle will be about 30% to 35% less than that of a standard 3 inch 12 gauge load and at range about 50% less. Finally, and I believe most important is that there is no "choking" action on a muzzle loading rifle and the effective kill range is severally decreased. Taking into account the above considerations it is my opinion that the opportunity to wound and not kill a turkey is too great and therefore not worth pursuing.

However, should you decide to accept the challenge of using a muzzle loading rifle for turkey hunting the effective kill range may be no greater than 15 yards. Loading your gun with shot is slightly different than using a single projectile. The typical standard is to use like physical amounts of powder and shot. Powder down the barrel first, then a properly sized "Wonder Patch", then the shot followed by 1 or 2 more "Wonder Patches". A Wonder Patch is a thick, stiff cotton disc shaped patch that will hold the powder and shot in place.

There are several muzzle loading shotguns on the market and probably provide a better solution than using a rifle. I have killed 2 turkeys with my muzzle loading shotgun and I completely understand you interest in the tradition of using a black powder gun for turkey. Hopefully you get some other folks opinions but the above observations come with over 20 years experience shooting black powder guns. Have a great day!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
A good way to keep rain and water from getting your powder wet is to stretch a small balloon over the end of your barrel. This prevents water from entering and you can shoot right through it as it has no influence on the bullet as it leaves the barrel. A good way to keep your self dry is the BuckWing PortaRoof Umbrella. It attaches to a tree and has a 54 inch diameter of protection. I was very glad that I had one several times during October when it rained while I was bow hunting. Good luck to all! I will be in my tree stand on the morning of the 12th with my muzzle loader loaded and ready to rock.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,536 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Scuba Jay Is the Muzzleloader King!!! You DA Man!

Awesome info!

I have two birds under my belt, and looking for another challenge. This would be great! Did I mention that this year my daughter will be joining me


It would be sweet! The spot that I have, the furthest distance was 20 yards. Both time my buddy and I pulled doubles!!! Could have been a triple the second time. I've been turkey hunting for7 years now! This will be the eighth. Hooked for life. Will not miss it!

Scuba...I see you are a NB'r
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
I grew up in and have lived in New Baltimore for 42 years. The town sure has changed a ton in the last 15 years or so but I guess that should be expected. The dairy farm that was across the street from my parent's house in now a subdivision as is all of the areas that I used to small game hunt and ride motorcycles and snowmobiles as a lad. I still like the town I just hate all the traffic.

I started hunting turkeys about 15 years ago up in the Alpena area. I have shot 9 turkeys over the years including the 5 of the last 6 years. I find turkey hunting as exciting as any form of hunting because of the interaction with the toms. NOTHING can compare to the gobble of an excited tom headed your direction. I purchased 30 acres in Midland County this last summer and I shot a turkey during the fall hunt. It is not as exciting as the spring hunt but I still had a blast. The last 2 turkeys that I have shot have been with my muzzleloader shotgun.

I too take my kids with me a field. My daughter is 14 and my son is 13 and they have both been on deer hunts, turkey hunts and all kinds of small game hunts. They have yet to take a deer or turkey but I know that I will be as proud as can be the day that it happens. They have been shooting archery since they were 5 years old and have proven to be very accurate with their bows.

Good luck with the "front stuffer" and make sure you knock 'em dead.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,536 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
QUOTE(Scubajay @ Dec 10 2003, 09:51 PM)I grew up in and have lived in New Baltimore for 42 years. The town sure has changed a ton in the last 15 years or so but I guess that should be expected. The dairy farm that was across the street from my parent's house in now a subdivision as is all of the areas that I used to small game hunt and ride motorcycles and snowmobiles as a lad. I still like the town I just hate all the traffic.

I started hunting turkeys about 15 years ago up in the Alpena area. I have shot 9 turkeys over the years including the 5 of the last 6 years. I find turkey hunting as exciting as any form of hunting because of the interaction with the toms. NOTHING can compare to the gobble of an excited tom headed your direction. I purchased 30 acres in Midland County this last summer and I shot a turkey during the fall hunt. It is not as exciting as the spring hunt but I still had a blast. The last 2 turkeys that I have shot have been with my muzzleloader shotgun.

I too take my kids with me a field. My daughter is 14 and my son is 13 and they have both been on deer hunts, turkey hunts and all kinds of small game hunts. They have yet to take a deer or turkey but I know that I will be as proud as can be the day that it happens. They have been shooting archery since they were 5 years old and have proven to be very accurate with their bows.

Good luck with the "front stuffer" and make sure you knock 'em dead.
I hear ya about the NB situation....It was terrible when all the construction was going on
. Where my house now sits. I used to snowmobile there, I had no issues buying there cuz I knew they didn't rip out a bunch of trees. Used to hunt off of Baker. Things change. But I wouldn't trade it for the likes of where we came from. We are so happy here and enjoy coming home. People are much more friendlier, and hospitable.

Alpena eh...I did my first 4 years in the Huron National forest...So beautiful up there!

It is so good to hear that you exposed your children to the hunting tradidtion! It is good for them to be in touch with nature. Everyone thinks that hunting is about taking animals, when just being out there is good enough.

I will be talking to you about the muzzleloader topic!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
It is so good to hear that you exposed your children to the hunting tradidtion! It is good for them to be in touch with nature. Everyone thinks that hunting is about taking animals, when just being out there is good enough.

I will be talking to you about the muzzleloader topic!!!!
I could not agree more. There are so many fantastic things that occur while one takes the opportunity to spend time in the outdoors. Killing is not what it is all about but it certainly is a part of it. I have spent hundreds of hours in the woods without killing anything and I believe that the experience has made me have a greater appreciation for the wilderness. All of the hunters that I spend time with think the same way. How cool is it to have a chickadee land on your arrow and peck at it or to see a pine marten that has turned white for the winter running around the forest floor or to see an owl swoop down and grab a mouse. These things and thousands of others are what the folks that do not take the occasion to get out there miss out on seeing.

I too used to hunt along Baker and also 24 Mile Road, Ridge Road and many others spots around NB.

Fire away with your muzzleloader questions and I will do my best to answer them. I am certainly not the end all of information when it comes to shooting a black powder rifle but I am willing to bet that I have put 4000 to 5000 rounds through my MZ guns in the past 20 years and I do have some good information to pass along.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,824 Posts
QUOTE(garydebs @ Nov 29 2003, 10:46 AM)Just curious if there were any muzzleloaders out there?
yeah, just once, it was a long time ago, i was young, and i was really drunk
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top