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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know most of you won't give a crap about this, but I'll share anyway...


Almost two years ago I made the switch to a digital video camera. Obviously the video quality (HD) has vastly improved in recent years, but one of the biggest benefits as far as I'm concerned is the switch from linear access tapes, to random access digital data. Easier to access, and easier to backup.

One of the things I never liked about my miniDV videos is that I had no good way to backup my irreplaceable recordings. Buying a second camera or a miniDV deck were cost prohibitive, and saving the captured video wasn't real practical either. At 13 or 14 GB and hour, storing 30+ tapes on disk just wasn't practical. But not anymore!

Now, for a little over a hundred bucks, I have a 640 GB, USB bus powered, 2.5" external drive that will hold ALL 30+ hours of my miniDV tapes. Very cool! A no power brick, fits in a shirt pocket device thats easily accessed, stored, and copied/backed up.

There is another benefit to this permanent captured strategy too, no more fighting tape timecodes!!! YES!

One of the professional techniques in dealing with the above storage limitation of video tapes is for editing software (Final Cut Pro in my case) to keep track of which tape(s) is the source(s) for a video project. Sort of analogous to keeping track of where text came from in a Word document, so as to be able to retrieve it again at a later date, without actually storing it locally in the meantime. In order for this ability to later re-capture the video the used in a video project to work, there is a "timecode" written to the tape as it's recorded. Problem is, any break in the timecode would screw up the process of capturing the video. A simple thing such as viewing the tape, and not beginning further recordings on that tape on top of some part of the previous recordings would cause a timecode gap.

In short, capturing miniDV tapes with professional-ish software was always prone to hassle.

But not any more! YES! Now I'm capturing the video without any timecode hassles, creating a repeatable access path, and making it all accessible in a much more convenient work-flow.

So now is the time people. Break out those old home videos and breath new life into them!
 

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I have a few external hard drives for storage also.

The problem for me is...
After I copy the file(s) BACK to my PC for editing and producing a DVD, I can not return the file to the external HD.Just using the edited (trimed) portions
It seems that all the files must stay on the PC untill I finish editing then produce/ burn the dvd.
I do not know if thats correct, but it`s the only was I can store a unfinished production(mpeg-burn file-iso)?
It my have to do with the cyberlink software program I`m using that came with my HD cam.

We need a Photo/Video forum ( lol ) ....some place to compair info and software? Or I just need to take a class at the local college.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
QUOTE(RK4BASSIN @ Feb 21 2010, 09:53 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I have a few external hard drives for storage also.

The problem for me is...
After I copy the file(s) BACK to my PC for editing and producing a DVD, I can not return the file to the external HD.Just using the edited (trimed) portions
It seems that all the files must stay on the PC untill I finish editing then produce/ burn the dvd.
I do not know if thats correct, but it`s the only was I can store a unfinished production(mpeg-burn file-iso)?
It my have to do with the cyberlink software program I`m using that came with my HD cam.
DVD is an end-product, and not a good source for editable material.

Lately, I don't even bother with DVDs. It takes too long to compress, and the end product is of lower quality than what you can upload to YouTube. (Blu-Ray excluded, of course. Still too expensive for my taste.)

Not sure of the equivalent on PCs, but I backup my HD recordings by making a "disk image" file of the SD card. Disk images are files that are exact duplicates of a disk. They behave just as the original -- opening it has the same result as connecting/inserting/mounting the original volume, and has the advantage of being storable on any volume, while maintain 100% fidelity of the original. Plus, it works out well to keep recordings in 1 hour segments, as 1 hour will fit on inexpensive single sided DVD-R's.

On my setup, 1 hour of video as written by the camera = 4GB. Captured for editing, 720p = apx. 15GB an hour, while full 1080 is 40GB an hour. Pretty amazing 4GB becomes 40!
 

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I hear ya.

I had a terrabyte of storage back when it cost an arm and a leg. I would edit 3 and 4 camera shoots which meant 3 or 4 times the storage needed. A 2 hour high school play took a lot of very expensive drive space. Not only that but rendering on 500mhz processor was painfully(hours)slow.

I always backed up the final edited version to a dv tape.

I also got in the habit of buying 2 identical size drives but different manufactures every time I added a new one. I would then have two copies. The odds of two different manufacturers drives failing are not as bad.

I just lost a 320g drive last week. That drive is backed up to two others. You only have to lose data once to come up with a good backup plan. Anything that can't be replaced should be on at least two drives and probablly a third. I also have copies stored off site in case of a fire or theft.

One other thing I learned is 320g is about as big as I'll go for backing stuff up because of the time needed to copy or restore data. Although my next batch will probably be 500g.

I never had trouble with capturing mini dv tapes. I learned that whole time code thing early on. I also learned several tricks to sync 3 cameras to one audio source.

Capturing and editing has become pretty easy lately. I get frustrated watching someones home movies right out of the camera because they don't take the time to edit.

Matt
 

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QUOTE(Away Point @ Feb 21 2010, 10:12 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(RK4BASSIN @ Feb 21 2010, 09:53 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I have a few external hard drives for storage also.

The problem for me is...
After I copy the file(s) BACK to my PC for editing and producing a DVD, I can not return the file to the external HD.Just using the edited (trimed) portions
It seems that all the files must stay on the PC untill I finish editing then produce/ burn the dvd.
I do not know if thats correct, but it`s the only was I can store a unfinished production(mpeg-burn file-iso)?
It my have to do with the cyberlink software program I`m using that came with my HD cam.
DVD is an end-product, and not a good source for editable material.

Lately, I don't even bother with DVDs. It takes too long to compress, and the end product is of lower quality than what you can upload to YouTube. (Blu-Ray excluded, of course. Still too expensive for my taste.)

Not sure of the equivalent on PCs, but I backup my HD recordings by making a "disk image" file of the SD card. Disk images are files that are exact duplicates of a disk. They behave just as the original -- opening it has the same result as connecting/inserting/mounting the original volume, and has the advantage of being storable on any volume, while maintain 100% fidelity of the original. Plus, it works out well to keep recordings in 1 hour segments, as 1 hour will fit on inexpensive single sided DVD-R's.

On my setup, 1 hour of video as written by the camera = 4GB. Captured for editing, 720p = apx. 15GB an hour, while full 1080 is 40GB an hour. Pretty amazing 4GB becomes 40!


PC equivalent, or at least the way I do it, is an iso image it is also cross platform as long as it's created in the 9660 standard. I use that a lot. It is how most software and DVDs are shared on the internet.

Matt
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
QUOTE(tcg @ Feb 21 2010, 11:59 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I hear ya.

I had a terrabyte of storage back when it cost an arm and a leg. I would edit 3 and 4 camera shoots which meant 3 or 4 times the storage needed. A 2 hour high school play took a lot of very expensive drive space. Not only that but rendering on 500mhz processor was painfully(hours)slow.

I always backed up the final edited version to a dv tape.

I also got in the habit of buying 2 identical size drives but different manufactures every time I added a new one. I would then have two copies. The odds of two different manufacturers drives failing are not as bad.

I just lost a 320g drive last week. That drive is backed up to two others. You only have to lose data once to come up with a good backup plan. Anything that can't be replaced should be on at least two drives and probablly a third. I also have copies stored off site in case of a fire or theft.

One other thing I learned is 320g is about as big as I'll go for backing stuff up because of the time needed to copy or restore data. Although my next batch will probably be 500g.

I never had trouble with capturing mini dv tapes. I learned that whole time code thing early on. I also learned several tricks to sync 3 cameras to one audio source.

Capturing and editing has become pretty easy lately. I get frustrated watching someones home movies right out of the camera because they don't take the time to edit.

Matt
Totally agree. Residing on multiple drives is the way to go. Burning optical discs is not only tedious, but have a much higher failure rate than hard drives.

You know the old saying; There are 2 types of computer users. Those who have lost data, and those who will!


Disk Images are great! I can create ISO 9660, or any of a number of other formats. On top of the uses mentioned already, they can serve as a "soft partition", and some of the other useful options include "sparse images" (drive spaced consumed grows with contents rather than size specified. I.E. a 10GB sparse image need not consume 10GB while empty), and 128 and 256 bit encryption. I use variations of these all the time.
 
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