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Just me again with more questions concerning our trip from Lake Erie, up the Detroit River to Lake St. Clair and then on to Sarnia, Ontario.

We were told we would only need passports and our boat registration information to enter Canada and then back into the USA. Now I am hearing stuff about having to have a I-68. We are leaving on July 03 and time is running short. Can someone offer information?
 

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To get into Canada it is good to have a passport on hand. What you will do when you arrive is call into Canadian customs with the supplied phone within the marina. Customs will ask you all their questions then give you an arrival number. Write the number down and keep it with the boat at all times that you are there. If they decide to check on you or the boat you will need to give the officer that number.

When returning to the US there has always been a number to call into. I like many people have never called in when returning in the past. I have never been stopped either. There is the rumor that the US and Canadian customs are communicating with each other now and know who is in and who out of the two countries. I really don't know for sure. We have decided to get the I-68 this year to be on the safe side. To apply for the I-68 form you need a passport. The I-68 card will have information on it that you will tell the customs rep when you call into US customs when returning to the US. It is pretty much that simple. Have the right paperwork. Know the rules and everything will be cool.
 

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QUOTE(Convincor @ Jun 25 2009, 08:36 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>To get into Canada it is good to have a passport on hand. What you will do when you arrive is call into Canadian customs with the supplied phone within the marina. Customs will ask you all their questions then give you an arrival number. Write the number down and keep it with the boat at all times that you are there. If they decide to check on you or the boat you will need to give the officer that number.

When returning to the US there has always been a number to call into. I like many people have never called in when returning in the past. I have never been stopped either. There is the rumor that the US and Canadian customs are communicating with each other now and know who is in and who out of the two countries. I really don't know for sure. We have decided to get the I-68 this year to be on the safe side. To apply for the I-68 form you need a passport. The I-68 card will have information on it that you will tell the customs rep when you call into US customs when returning to the US. It is pretty much that simple. Have the right paperwork. Know the rules and everything will be cool.

You don't need a Passport to apply for an I-68 unless they have changed the requirements this year.. All you need is a Certified birth certificate and a drivers license plus 4 passport photos.
 

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And here is another surprise, at least to me. Made the crossing last week, We have I-68s but had a visitor from Europe with us so we thought it would be good to call in. No problems in Canada, they came out for a quick visit just for our guest and wished up a good time in Canada.

The U. S. gives you three options of where you MUST land. 1)some place in downriver, 2)Erma Henderson Marina some place by Sinbads, or 3)Metro Beach. We chose Metro. The guys who came out were super cool, almost enjoyed their visit if it wasn't so far from Nautical Mile, where I dock at. I asked what would have happened if I had gone to my boat slip, then called and waited for them. They said I may have been issued a violation for not going to a designated check-in spot and, very unlikely, could have had my boat seized! That is for following the law.

I sent a note to Rep. Candice Miller asking if it were possible to have the Coast Gaurd Station at 10 Mile Rd. as a designated check-in. I think she was instrumental in all that Homeland Security stuff at Selfridge. Have not got a response yet. Hope this helps.
 

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We were given a presentation from the head of U.S. DHS CBP (United States Dept. of Homeland Security, Customs and Border Protection) for the Port Huron office, several months ago. Here is the story, as best I recollect it, and from The Admiral's and my NEXUS process:

There are two components to crossing the border between the U.S. and Canada--three if your boat is over 30' in length.

The first component is proper identification. This consists, for U.S. residents, of a passport. For U.S./Michigan residents: Michigan's enhanced driver's license can be used in place of a passport.

The second component is a pre-approval or pre-clearance program that's a joint program between the U.S. and Canada. (Think of it as them asking you all the same questions they might when crossing the border, in advance, once
.) There are two: I-68 and NEXUS. I don't know much about I-68, except enrollment is annual, it's cheaper than NEXUS, and I believe the enrollment process is the same as for NEXUS. Enrollment in NEXUS is for five years and costs $50. You have to fill out a somewhat extensive form, either on paper or on-line, and pay the non-refundable $50 application fee. They'll process the form, doing criminal background checks, etc., and, assuming you "pass," will notify you that you have to schedule an interview.

Btw: I understand if you've ever been convicted of a DUI, Canada will not approve your participation in NEXUS, at least, and maybe I-68, as well.

You need a passport or Michigan EDL. You don't need to participate in the I-68 or NEXUS programs, but it'll make crossing faster and easier each way--especially on return to the U.S. Without membership in either program, you are required by law to report to a U.S. port of entry on return to the U.S. Being in either program allows you to call in to be cleared if everybody on the boat is enrolled in either program. They will tell you at the time you call in if you are to be inspected. We were told by the head of U.S. DHS CBP in Port Huron that the agents will come to you, where you dock. But they may require to to report to a port of entry. Either way: If they want to inspect you, nobody is allowed to leave the boat until the inspection is conducted.

Whether you're enrolled in I-68 or NEXUS, or not, when you land in Canada you're required to report to Canadian CBSA by phone. They will tell you at the time whether they wish to inspect you. Either way: They'll give you an identification number. Record this. You'll be required to give it to U.S. DHS CBP upon return to the U.S.

According to the U.S. DHS CBP and Canadian CBSA personnel present at our interview: A NEXUS card now serves as proper identification for U.S./Canada border crossings, but I'd verify that personally, rather than taking my word on it.

The last component, for boats over 30' LOA, is a boat registration program. I know nothing about it, being as our boat is 30' LOA, so we didn't have to bother with it.

I'll be happy to answer an further quesions you have, but I don't know if I can make it any simpler.

I strongly recommend you not fail to follow the rules. The penalties can be quite severe: Up to and including confiscation of your boat and her contents, non-trivial fines, detention, and deportation of non-U.S. residents. IME: DHS CBP, in particular, do not have much of a sense of humour about these things.

Jim
 

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Another newbie question. What if you are leaving a USA harbor, crossing in to Canada to fish muskies along the south shore of LSC, and returning back to the same US harbor, without stepping foot on Canadian soil? I do have a USA passport.
Thanks.
 

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QUOTE(Bear2 @ Jul 28 2009, 03:00 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Another newbie question. What if you are leaving a USA harbor, crossing in to Canada to fish muskies along the south shore of LSC, and returning back to the same US harbor, without stepping foot on Canadian soil? I do have a USA passport.
Thanks.
I wondered the same thing. If I dont have contact with any boat or land can I come and go without reporting? Also do I need a canadian fishing license if I enter their waters?
 

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QUOTE(Diver Down @ Jul 28 2009, 04:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(Bear2 @ Jul 28 2009, 03:00 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Another newbie question. What if you are leaving a USA harbor, crossing in to Canada to fish muskies along the south shore of LSC, and returning back to the same US harbor, without stepping foot on Canadian soil? I do have a USA passport.
Thanks.
I wondered the same thing. If I dont have contact with any boat or land can I come and go without reporting? Also do I need a canadian fishing license if I enter their waters?

As long as you don't anchor you will not have any problems. Yes you have to have a Canadian fishing license if your fishing in their waters and if you have any live bait it must be purchased from a Canadian source and you have to have a reciept to prove that you bought the bait from Canada. It's against the law to transport live bait from another state into Canada.
 

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QUOTE(ColPepper @ Jul 29 2009, 06:25 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>As long as you don't anchor you will not have any problems.
According to the head of the Port Huron DHS CBP office, who gave a presentation at our sail club this past spring: Anchoring in Canadian waters does not consitute "landing." However...

QUOTE(ColPepper @ Jul 29 2009, 06:25 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Yes you have to have a Canadian fishing license if your fishing in their waters and if you have any live bait it must be purchased from a Canadian source and you have to have a reciept to prove that you bought the bait from Canada. It's against the law to transport live bait from another state into Canada.
Here's the rub: As I recall it: Hooking up (rafting off of) a Canadian boat in Canadian waters does consitute "landing," regardless of whether one, the other, both of you or neither of you are anchored. The Canadian water cops are, well, Canadians on Canadian boats in Canadian waters, so if they choose to check you out...

Jim
 

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QUOTE(SEMIJim @ Jul 29 2009, 07:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(ColPepper @ Jul 29 2009, 06:25 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>As long as you don't anchor you will not have any problems.
According to the head of the Port Huron DHS CBP office, who gave a presentation at our sail club this past spring: Anchoring in Canadian waters does not consitute "landing." However...

QUOTE(ColPepper @ Jul 29 2009, 06:25 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Yes you have to have a Canadian fishing license if your fishing in their waters and if you have any live bait it must be purchased from a Canadian source and you have to have a reciept to prove that you bought the bait from Canada. It's against the law to transport live bait from another state into Canada.
Here's the rub: As I recall it: Hooking up (rafting off of) a Canadian boat in Canadian waters does consitute "landing," regardless of whether one, the other, both of you or neither of you are anchored. The Canadian water cops are, well, Canadians on Canadian boats in Canadian waters, so if they choose to check you out...

Jim


Heres another rub,
If you anchor in Crystal bay on the Detroit river which is in Canadian waters you first have to check in with Canadian Authorities.. I found this out while anchored in Crystal Bay about 8 years ago.. I didn't get in trouble but I was made to pull anchor and go to BobLo Island to call in before returning to anchor. Take my advice and call in.. It's not worth the hassel..
 

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QUOTE(Waldawg @ Jul 29 2009, 04:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>We were thinking of going to Cove marina with the kids. Do they need an I68 as well?
You don't need an I68 to go to Canada.. You need it or the Nexas to return to The US without a hassle. The I68 is not for going it's for returning. The Canadian CBP wil not ask you if you have an I-68 form, only the US CBP will. Here is the info I have on my AuxCG website concernig I-68s.. Some of the info is a little old like the port of entries and I need to update my website with the current info but most of it still stands.

Customs and Border Protection Requirements
Boaters in the Detroit area must call (313) 226-3810 upon arrival in the U.S. If your vessel is over 30' in length, you must have a current Customs User Fee Decal, and the decal number will be required when you call in. You will be queried about how long your stay was in Canada, how many people are aboard, their citizenships, what you are bringing into the U.S. You will be asked the marina you have landed at, and your
state registration number. You will be asked if you have I-68s for all passengers. You will be given a log number for reference. If the goods you are importing require payment of duty, you will be instructed how to pay that amount.

Note:
The Immigration and Naturalization Service and the U.S. Customs Service are now combined in one agency- the U.S. Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, which in turn is part of the Department of Homeland Security

Option 1 (I-68 holder): You have a valid I-68 . Every family member, if applicable, is listed on the form. Any guests on board have their own Form I-68. Having appeared, in person, to apply for the revised Form I-68 program, being fingerprinted and supplying three passport size (1"x1") photos satisfies the CBP immigration inspection requirement.

Option 2 (non I-68 holder): You must appear before a CBP inspector upon arrival at a designated Port-Of-Entry for immigration inspection. You will be instructed to report to the CBP office at either the Ambassador Bridge or the Detroit/Windsor Tunnel, which are open 24 hours a day. Any boater not participating in the I-68 Program will have to undergo this process each time they return from Canada.

What you need (I-68):
The initial inspection involves an interview, checking the individual in the Interagency Border Inspection System (IBIS) and possibly other law enforcement databases, processing 3 photographs, imprinting a single
fingerprint on each copy of the form, and payment of the fee. You will need proof of U.S. citizenship that
clearly establishes identity and nationality such as a birth record or baptismal record for each person. All family members must appear in person, and those 14 and older must have their own photograph (children under 14 will be included on the parents' forms, and need no photograph).

What is the cost of the Form I-68?
The fee for an individual Form I-68 is $16.00. There is a family cap of $32.00, but each member of the family who is 14 years of age or older must obtain a separate Form I-68. Children under 14 years of age will be entered on their parent's form. For fee purposes, a family is defined as husband, wife, unmarried children under 21 years of age, and parents of either the husband or wife. Fees may be paid by personal checks, cashiers checks, certified checks or money orders made payable to the DHS (Department of Homeland Security).

Canadian Boat-Landing Permit (I-68) Information:
The Canadian Boat Landing Permit was reinstated with additional security enhancements on April 9, 2002.
Only the current Form I-68 will be accepted. To obtain general information on the I-68, please call (313) 446-3499, or one of the Ports of Entry listed below. You must apply in-person for an I-68 at one of the following offices:

Ambassador Bridge
3033 Porter Street
Detroit, Michigan 48216
Phone number: (313) 226-3141
Hours of Operation: 24 hours

Detroit Tunnel
150 East Jefferson
Detroit, Michigan 48226
Phone number: (313) 568-6019
Hours of Operation: 24 hours

What you need (User Fee Decal- over 30' only):
The information needed for the decal is the boat manufacturer, model, year, vessel name, hull id number and state registration number (or USCG Documentation number). The decal, which costs $25 can be obtained online at www.customs.ustreas.gov/travel/travel.htm or by obtaining a Annual User Fee Decal Request Form (CF-339): (a) from a local U.S. Customs port, (
by calling Decal Inquiries at (317) 298-1200, ext. 1245.

Note:
If the national Threat Level is raised above Yellow, applications for the I-68 program are suspended. Boaters with valid I-68s will still be able to return from Canada.

This information was compiled as a service to Detroit-area boaters by the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary from
information supplied by the U.S. Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, and is accurate as of June 27, 2003. To verify current program requirements, call one of the numbers listed above.
 

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QUOTE(ColPepper @ Jul 29 2009, 06:25 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>if you have any live bait it must be purchased from a Canadian source and you have to have a reciept to prove that you bought the bait from Canada. It's against the law to transport live bait from another state into Canada.

That law is one of the most ridiculous law I have EVER heard of. THE BAIT IS GOING IN THE SAME BODY OF WATER BOTH COUNTRIES SHARE!!! What a joke.
 

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QUOTE(Convincor @ Jul 30 2009, 09:42 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(ColPepper @ Jul 29 2009, 06:25 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>if you have any live bait it must be purchased from a Canadian source and you have to have a reciept to prove that you bought the bait from Canada. It's against the law to transport live bait from another state into Canada.

That law is one of the most ridiculous law I have EVER heard of. THE BAIT IS GOING IN THE SAME BODY OF WATER BOTH COUNTRIES SHARE!!! What a joke.



Doyou need an I-68 if you have a current US Passport?
Please advise.
 

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You do not need an I-68 or passport to enter Canada. You must have some sort of I.D. in case boarder patrol in Canada wants to check you out and a passport is a good thing to have. Coming back to the U.S. you must have either a Nexus card, an I-68, a passort, or an enhanced drivers license. You only need one of the four. With a Nexus or I-68 only a call in is required. With the other 2 U.S. boarder patrol may want to visit or require you to go to a specified marina for inspection. You can call about an hour before you arrive on your cell phone for instructions. All on board must have one of these I.D.'s, not just the captain. When we got our I-68's from Algonac we asked about minors. They told us under 16 does not need the above 4, but if you take a minor to Canada they may request a birth certificate for them.

When you call in Canada, you must use a land phone. All marina's have one available. I have tried by cell and I get a message that the call is not allowed. You can call by land from here for further instructions to the same number you call in over there, 1-888 226-7277. The first time you call in over there can be long, have your boat serial number handy. It is on your registration. After your first call-in, you are "registered" in there computer. For future trips it is a very quick process. You need the full name and birth date for all people on board. They also become attached to your MC #'s. So the more you go there, especially with the same people, the quicker the process becomes.
 

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LOL It's amazing to me how many times the same question is asked and answered in the same thread when all it takes usually is for the person asking the question to read or skim through the thread to find his answer.
 

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QUOTE(ColPepper @ Aug 3 2009, 06:59 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>LOL It's amazing to me how many times the same question is asked and answered in the same thread when all it takes usually is for the person asking the question to read or skim through the thread to find his answer.
Yeah, re-reading this thread, after it was referenced from another, I just saw that.


All the I68, NEXUS, US DHS CBP and Canadian CBSA requirements have already been answered in this thread--sometimes more than once. Asking the same question that's already been asked and answered isn't going to change the answer.

Jim
 

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QUOTE(Convincor @ Jul 30 2009, 09:42 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(ColPepper @ Jul 29 2009, 06:25 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>if you have any live bait it must be purchased from a Canadian source and you have to have a reciept to prove that you bought the bait from Canada. It's against the law to transport live bait from another state into Canada.

That law is one of the most ridiculous law I have EVER heard of. THE BAIT IS GOING IN THE SAME BODY OF WATER BOTH COUNTRIES SHARE!!! What a joke.



There is a law about crossing the border with live bait. The bait can be dead though.

In Michigan you also must save your reciept to prove where the bait is from. LSC is a VHS positive lake, so it is still enforced, but the damage is already done. The reciept is to prove that the bait is certified VHS free. This is VERY important to stopping the spread of the disease into VHS negative waters.
 

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This whole I-68 thing has been a pain since it started many years ago. It was originally started to stop boaters from running to Canada to fuel up for less money. It's funny that private pilots, and people who cross in cars do not need this form. Only boaters. I guess there are not enough of us to raise a stink and get this changed. This has nothing to do with terrorism. The bad guys don't bother to get call when the comeinto the country. WAKE UP PEOPLE!
 

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U.S. Customs Clarifies Policy on Anchoring in Canadian Waters
JCAcheson - 31 October 2008
Leaving a U.S. port to anchor in Canadian waters does not constitute leaving the United States or require reporting to Customs and Border Protection (CBP) on return to port.

CBP's Assistant Port Director in Port Huron recently clarified their policy on "pleasure vessel reporting after anchoring in foreign waters". It reads as follows (with syntax modified for clarity):

"[U.S. flagged] pleasure vessels are only required to report their arrival when they have touched foreign soil, have had contact with a foreign hovering vessel or received merchandise outside United States territorial waters. Small pleasure vessels leaving [a] United States port [and proceeding] into international or foreign waters without a call at a foreign port are not considered to have made a departure for the purpose of CBP reporting requirements. Therefore. . .any vessel which leaves from [a] United States port and returns without calling at a foreign port or place [has] not departed the United States and [is] not required to report [its] arrival to CBP."

This interpretation is slightly at odds with Canadian policy, in that they maintain that anchoring anywhere in Canadian waters constitutes landing in that country.
 
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