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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
NOTE: First and foremost, I apologize for missing Friday's weather report, and Thursday's DNR fishing report. Here in Clinton Township (15 Mile and Kelly Road area) we lost power at exactly 3:20PM Thursday afternoon. Power and cable were finally restored Saturday around 5:00PM. This area was hardest hit from the "storm" that blew through here. Measured wind gust was clocked at 78.8 mph with an 82mph gust just offshore northeast of Detroit over the water. I will be back to normal reporting starting Monday, so don't worry. Without further do, here is this past week's DNR report.

Some rivers in the Lower Peninsula are running high and fast. Catch rates will improve once the waters clear up. Warmer weather has improved fishing conditions so more anglers are out.

Southeast Lower Peninsula

Lake Erie - Has fair walleye fishing. Even though recent storms have left the lake muddy once again, the walleyes are coming in closer to shore because the Mayfly hatch is in full swing. Anglers have caught fish in 18 to 20 feet of water when using crawlers and spoons. Perch fishing remains fair with most fish caught just off the River Raisin or Stoney Point. Good numbers of white perch were caught. Catfish were caught off Pte. Mouillee. Crawlers and shrimp were the best bait.

Huron River - Water levels are up but the river was fishable. Anglers are catching fair to good numbers of largemouth bass, smallmouth bass and pike.

Detroit River - Perch have been caught around Celeron Island and Sugar Island when using minnows along the weed beds. A few walleye were caught in the lower river near the mouth.

Lexington - Lake trout, coho, chinook and a few walleye were caught when trolling in 30 to 80 feet of water. Pier anglers did well catching a mix of bluegills, rock bass, crappie, smallmouth bass and small perch.

Harbor Beach - Steelhead action is good in waters up to 110 feet deep. Try trolling bright colored spoons about 100 feet behind the offshore boards. Some nice lake trout were caught in 80 to 110 feet of water using spoons or Dodgers with spin and glows fishing close to the bottom. Try gold, green camo, and orange. Salmon fishing is slow but some were caught. For walleye, try casting spoons and body baits or trolling Hot-n-Tots or crawler harnesses in 20 to 50 feet of water. Bass fishing is the best it has been in a long time with good numbers caught around the weed beds inside the harbor. For perch, try closer to shore with minnows.

Port Austin - Boat anglers out trolling for walleye have caught whitefish on a crawler harness. Perch anglers are just getting started but they are not catching a lot of fish. Most are drifting in 20 feet of water until they find fish, then drop anchor.

Saginaw Bay - Walleye were caught in 5 to 7 feet of water on the Callahan Reef, 4 feet off Linwood, 10 feet off the Kawkawlin River and 7 to 17 feet in the Slot off Sebewaing and Bay Port. Try the weed beds south of the tower on Sand Point. Good catches of channel cats in 3 to 4 feet of water off Sebewaing. Caseville anglers are taking their boats to Sebewaing or Bay Port.

Saginaw River - Shore anglers are taking walleye in the lower river between Smith Park and Essexville. Smallmouth bass and rock bass were caught.
 

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You live at 15 and kelly? I thought you were west of me? I live at 15 and kelly too, same deal with the power. I was out taking pictures of the lightning until the rain started coming down. Got some video of the storm, one of the sweetest ones ive taped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
QUOTE(PelicanKayaker @ Jun 28 2009, 03:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>You live at 15 and kelly? I thought you were west of me? I live at 15 and kelly too, same deal with the power. I was out taking pictures of the lightning until the rain started coming down. Got some video of the storm, one of the sweetest ones ive taped.

Nice job. lol We just moved here 2 weeks ago from our old house near 16 and Grosebeck. Where exactly are you at in this area? I live by the 711 on the corner of 15 and Kelly. Street is called Ellery in that neighborhood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
QUOTE(PelicanKayaker @ Jun 28 2009, 03:59 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>holy sh!t, lol. We live in the same sub now, lmao. I live at the corner of kenna and garret.

LOL I probably passed your house 15 times now.
I can walk to your house in 2 minutes or less, and vice versa. We'll have to hook up some time and go get some fish together.
Nice to know I still live by somebody down the street from me who loves to fish, and is on the site.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
QUOTE(PelicanKayaker @ Jun 28 2009, 05:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(scotts fishing @ Jun 28 2009, 05:22 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>i know what you mean i just got power back today myself ok Jason y didn't you tell me it was going to be that bad


Hey i made a post that said the storms were coming, lol.


Thanks for covering for me. Hard to imagine that one single supercell thunderstorm caused "most" of the damage here in Macomb county.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
QUOTE(PelicanKayaker @ Jun 28 2009, 06:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The scariest part of it was how quick it developed. It developed out of nowhere and it grew really fast. It was definetly one of the nicest storms ive seen in awhile. Just wish i would have gotten more lightning shots, but it caught me off guard and i didnt have my gear set.

lol Funny thing is, this was the same rotating supercell thunderstorm that prompted the tornado warning for Lapeer County where a brief touchdown was apparently reported from what I "heard". The storm then rooted itself on what's called a lake breeze boundary or miniature cold front that comes off the cooler lake waters and moves inland. When this happened, the storm made what's called a "right turn" meaning it was moving right of the mean wind flow direction in the mid levels of the atmosphere. Right movers are ALWAYS bad news. No matter what, they generally produce the most violent cases of severe weather, and major damage reports. These right movers account for most of the violent tornadoes spawned as well. Going back to Thursday's case, this storm ingested another developing supercell thunderstorm north of Sterling Heights, and when this happened it lost it's warm moist inflow layer or fuel, and lost some of its low level rotation. Hence the tornado warning was never extended into Macomb County. The storm was still rotating nicely though as it continued ESE towards the northern Detroit suburbs. As it passed through the Clinton Township area, a measured wind gust of 78.8mph was clocked, and an offshore water report north of Detroit measured an 82.4mph gust with the same storm before exiting into Canada. This storm was at maximum intensity over Clinton Township and at the time its top, or tallest cloud height above the anvil, was pushing 58,000 feet, just under 12 miles high. This indicates a very intense updraft capable of generating copious amounts of severe weather. At this time radar was indicating 2.75 inch hail over the city, but reports only indicated tear drop to quarter sized hail at most. This storm also accounted for the brief major flooding that was reported through out the area in Macomb County. A pretty rare event for our area, but it just goes to show a little taste of what folks in the "plains states" deal with on a daily basis in spring when these storms erupt in their backyard. Here are a few radar shots of how this all unfolded.

This is when the storm made the right turn and started moving ESE after the tornado warning expired. This is a classic "flying eagle" radar signature with the V shape being the precipitation fanning out in the anvil like position. This indicates a right moving storm with a strong updraft. You can also see another developing supercell thunderstorm with a similar V notch forming north of Sterling Heights. This is what I was refering to earlier.

World Rectangle Map Nature Black


This is when the storm was just entering Clinton Township. Here you can see what we call the infamous "hook echo" on the SW side of the storm. This indicates the presence of a mesocyclone and a rotating updraft of which "could" produce a tornado. This is a classic radar signature we look for in tornado producers. This signature can also mean strong damaging winds, and large hail likely as the rotating updraft produces larger ice nuclei in the cloud to fall down below.

Colorfulness World Map Rectangle Nature


This was taken at the same time the storm started dropping hail in Clinton Township, and a minute or two later is when the 78.8mph wind gust was measured. About 1 minute later, the power was taken out.

Colorfulness Map Nature Rectangle Organism
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Here you can see the storm weakening briefly, or what we call "cycling". The radar was indicating 1.6 inch hail within the core right over Clinton Township, just under golf ball size. Thankfully the hail wasn't larger than quarter size.

Colorfulness Map Green World Light


Here you can see the second Lapeer County supercell thunderstorm that formed a little after the first one exited the area. Again, you can clearly see the V-notch echo on radar indicating a rotating right moving supercell thunderstorm.

World Map Light Nature Green


And finally, this is a velocity radar image that we use to detect the movement of the turbulent winds within thunderstorms. At this time, Monroe County went under a tornado warning. Here in this image you can see the arrow I drew pointing to the black circled area. What you are looking at is called a "couplet". This is showing how strong the winds are within the thunderstorm, as well as in what direction they are blowing in. Here you can clearly see the red/green couplet indicative of strong low level rotation within the updraft of the thunderstorm. Green are winds blowing "towards" the radar in White Lake, while red are winds blowing "away" from the radar in White Lake. This counter-clockwise circulation is classic for locating tornado producing thunderstorms via Doppler radar.

Ecoregion World Map Rectangle Biome


This is pretty much a brief explanation of what happened on Thursday, and why that single supercell thunderstorm produced so much damage, mainly tree/power line related in a corridor from NW to SE across the area. Feel free to shoot me a PM if you'd like to know more, or have a question. Hopefully I made a little sense, and sorry for the long post. Mods, please move to the Fishing Hole if you'd like. I'll place this here for now as a response to what somebody else said, but again please feel free to re-locate as needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
QUOTE(cwright @ Jun 29 2009, 11:22 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Great summary. You are the storm dude, dude!

Excellent info provided.

lol Thanks. I tried to make it easy to understand as this was a fairly rare, and unusual event for us here in SE lower Michigan. It was fun tracking all of it, but I'm bummed I missed the hail and winds as I was at my friend's house this past week all week for his birthday. Mine is coming up on Wednesday, and although storms are forecasted, they don't look to be severe.
 
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