Lake St. Clair Fishing Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,184 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
By Marisa Schultz / The Detroit News, Friday, May 2, 2003

HARRISON TOWNSHIP -- Dow Chemical Canada Inc. will dig up nearly 45,000 cubic feet of contaminated sediment this summer on the bottom of the St. Clair River as part of a massive cleanup that Macomb County environmentals are praising.

The contaminated sediment contains mercury and chlorinated organic compounds that pose numerous health problems if ingested through drinking water or by eating fish.

The sediment has been sitting on the bottom of the river for decades after Dow Chemical dumped waste into the waterway in the 1950s and 1960s, when industry regulations were lower.

"It's like they are redeeming their sins of the past," said Linda Schweitzer, assistant professor at Oakland University who specializes in environmental toxicology and aquatic chemistry.

The $10 million project will begin next week and will be completed in eight to 15 weeks, said Catherine Creber, remediation leader at Dow Chemical Canada. The cleanup area is about 2,000 feet long and about 115 feet off the Sarnia, Ontario, shoreline, where Dow Chemical Canada is based.

Although the project is north of Macomb County, Macomb activists have been closely monitoring Dow's dredging plans because the river flows into Lake St. Clair.

Members of the Macomb County Water Quality Board are working with Dow to ensure the dredging won't stir up contaminated sediment that could travel downstream into the 13 drinking water intakes along the river.

"We just want to make sure they do it right," said Doug Martz of Harrison Township, chairman of the Macomb board, "because we have 6 million people drinking water downstream."

Larry Goodin, owner of Travis Restaurant in Harrison Township, used to be an avid fisherman. But concerns about contamination forced him to abandon his fishing poles. He won't eat fish caught in Lake St. Clair, nor will he let his five grandkids swim in the water.

"I'm all for Dow cleaning up the water as long as they don't push all that stuff downriver," said Goodin, 56.

Full Story Here
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
765 Posts
Thanks again for the info.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,804 Posts
QUOTE(Capt'n Mike @ May 5 2003, 01:53 AM)By Marisa Schultz / The Detroit News, Friday, May 2, 2003

HARRISON TOWNSHIP -- Dow Chemical Canada Inc. will dig up nearly 45,000 cubic feet of contaminated sediment this summer on the bottom of the St. Clair River as part of a massive cleanup that Macomb County environmentals are praising.

The contaminated sediment contains mercury and chlorinated organic compounds that pose numerous health problems if ingested through drinking water or by eating fish.

The sediment has been sitting on the bottom of the river for decades after Dow Chemical dumped waste into the waterway in the 1950s and 1960s, when industry regulations were lower.

"It's like they are redeeming their sins of the past," said Linda Schweitzer, assistant professor at Oakland University who specializes in environmental toxicology and aquatic chemistry.

The $10 million project will begin next week and will be completed in eight to 15 weeks, said Catherine Creber, remediation leader at Dow Chemical Canada. The cleanup area is about 2,000 feet long and about 115 feet off the Sarnia, Ontario, shoreline, where Dow Chemical Canada is based.

Although the project is north of Macomb County, Macomb activists have been closely monitoring Dow's dredging plans because the river flows into Lake St. Clair.

Members of the Macomb County Water Quality Board are working with Dow to ensure the dredging won't stir up contaminated sediment that could travel downstream into the 13 drinking water intakes along the river.

"We just want to make sure they do it right," said Doug Martz of Harrison Township, chairman of the Macomb board, "because we have 6 million people drinking water downstream."

Larry Goodin, owner of Travis Restaurant in Harrison Township, used to be an avid fisherman. But concerns about contamination forced him to abandon his fishing poles. He won't eat fish caught in Lake St. Clair, nor will he let his five grandkids swim in the water.

"I'm all for Dow cleaning up the water as long as they don't push all that stuff downriver," said Goodin, 56.

Full Story Here
This is the second phase if I am not mistaken. Phase one was done last summer...

Thanks for the info!

Mini
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top