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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm hoping someone can recommend someone to help me out. The block cracked on my 2000 Rinker. (freeze crack) It's a 5.7L EFI Bravo III system. I called a few dealers, and was quoted around $6000 for a new engine and labor. OUCH! The block is cracked, not the whole engine! So my new plan is, pull the engine myself, strip it down to the short block... and have the guts swapped into a new casting. A place on Grosebeck quoted $800 in parts and labor. This is a car place... would there be any difference between a 5.7 liter GM block and a 5.7 liter Mercruiser block? Can anyone speak from experience and recommend a similar shop?
Under a grand verses over 6 grand.... sounds like a plan, but will it work?
 

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I had something similar done once, but they fit each piston to the bores. Honed the block and stuff. I used Dynamic speed & Marine on jefferson at hall road. Call Ron at 586-949-5990 and tell him you know hammertime. It may be a couple bucks more, but you get what you pay for.

Will your insurance cover it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Apparently, my insurance policy doesn't cover damage due to freeze/thaw. I've never pulled a boat engine before, but for $5000.00 I'll figure it out!
Anymore suggestion/hints out there?
 

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I've done quite a few. Big blocks with alpha's and bravo's. Too much to type. You ever go to any LSCN outings?
 

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yes, there is a difference in the car and boat blocks, the car engines are machined to different specs, im no technichian but take it from someone who has had his 5.7 litre replaced 4 times and missed 1.5 seasons due to this

make sure you get the EXACT same year engine block, many places will quote you a price on a replacement block that is a 1985 engine that is rebuilt, that engine is not the same as what you have, get a 2000 new or rebuilt block

$6G is what I spent on my replacement, (1996 5.7 litre small block), one year warranty, hopefully i make it through the next season

whats it worth to you to miss a summer cause the replacement wasnt quite right and the boat did not run

why did it crack? not to question your skills, but if you did the winterizing and this happened what makes you think you can pull an engine and refit all the parts into the block and get it working correctly?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't plan on swapping the blocks, just removing the engine and driving it to a shop. Winterizing isn't rocket science, there was antifreeze flushed and all steps taken, but sometimes things just happen.
I'm assuming the quotes for a maina to do the work are so high because they don't want to take the time to do anything but swap old for new.
I didn't miss a bit last season, a little thing called JB Weld did the trick. This boat will be for sale the day it is fixed.... my conscience won't let me sell it as is.
 

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QUOTE(tripdog7 @ Feb 10 2004, 07:45 PM)Winterizing isn't rocket science,
Apparently it was harder than you thought
 

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If its your intention to sell it once you get it fixed, why not sell it now as it is? Obviously indicate what is wrong with it upfront.

Just thinking why go thru the hassel yourself or the money out of your pocket to just sell it. If you find a buyer that has the tools/skills to do the job themselves, I would think they would be willing to purchase it as it would be a decent deal.
 

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If you don't want to do it the right way and have a marine mechanic fix it to save money, then I would agree with the earlier comment, sell as is that way it doesn't come back to bite you. It isn't going to save you a whole lot of money pulling the motor yourself and sending it out, these guys pull a motor in less than 45 minutes. Call Lenny over at Milennyium marine and I bet he would have a motor sitting on the shelf now that could be dropped in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I thought of selling it as is, but how much would you think be lost with an epoxied engine block? The going price (at least according to asking prices) for a 2000 Rinker Captiva 232 cuddy with 5.7L Bravo III is about 25 grand. Subtact X amount for parts/labor verses Y amount for a sales price hit.... it's tough to say. I die grinded the crack to bare metal and applied a 2-part epoxy last June... and spent many weekends on Lake St. Clair with no problems. (but as a buyer, that probably wouldn't suffice)
 

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if your going to do it yourself go to idj on grosebeke, they do our stuff, we can help also, i have some parts that may help
dave blaz
586-783-3700
 

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The only difference between a marine and automotive block (of the same vintage) is that the marine block uses brass core (freeze) plugs. Core plugs cover the holes in the block that are there to support the block during the casting process. They are commonly referred to as freeze plugs, but serve no other purpose.

Machine tolerances are machine tolerances. The block doesn't care whether its going into a car or a boat. If you look up bore sizes and bearing clearances on the same vintage auto and marine blocks you'll find the same numbers. Swapping pistons is not that cut and dry though. Factory pistons come in a few different grade sizes. While all of them will fit, the best results come from machining the bore to the piston as Hammer stated. Your piston to bore clearances should be checked. Also, select fitting the main bearings is a good idea. This is done by checking the bearing to journal clearances with plasticguage. If the existing crank is std size (as it should be) it should drop right into a replacement block with std bearings without a problem.

As an ex Merc mechanic and current experimental mechanic for Ford I'll tell you how I'd go about block replacement.

1. Size the crank. Use new main bearings. Make sure the main bearing clearances are correct as stated above. Use the "new" specs rather than the "in service" ones. Con rod clearances should also be checked. Buy new bearings... they're cheap. I'd also go with new rod bolts.

2. Buy new pistons and have the block bored to match them. New rings should also be used.

3. If the replacement block is new the cam bearings will be fine. Make sure you keep the pushrods, lifters, and rockers in the same order in which they were removed.

4. Replace the oil pump. Never put an engine back together without doing so.

5. If there is any significant time on the engine at all, replace the timing chain and cam sprocket.

Following these guidelines you'll have a short block that is virtually new.

One other thing..... use synthetic oil after initial break in!!!!!
 
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