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We are new to LSC and need help finding where to go to fish. We have tried Bell River and had a little luck, but are often skunked. Can you give us a couple of waypoints and tips that can get us started. If you can give us Perch and Walleye tips it would help.
 

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These are my humble simple tips for summer perch and walleye action. There are some great fisherman who frequent this board who can offer you many other tips.

The lake offers so many great spots for perch fishing, but if you are looking for both perch and walleye on your trips I suggest that you find high weeds in deeper water (at least 12', but often better over 17' when you can find that) to target both. The best weeds are the clumps that have open water between them rather than the larger thick weed beds. Hopefully, you have a sonar unit and can monitor the bottom looking for the larger weed clumps, but the best clumps can be seen from the surface, either as dark green areas or with the weeds actually touching the surface. Anchor so the butt of your boat is just off the edge of the weed clumps in clearer water. If you can get as close as 3' to 5' that's great, but you should still be in good shape if you are within 15' of the clumps. You will have to account for both the current and the wind before dropping anchor, it takes a bit of practice. It is definitely worth it to re-anchor until you are in the right position.

Once you are anchored, use perch or crappie rigs (you can get these at most tackle shops) but don't use the hooks that come with them since they are horrible. Instead, get some Tru-turn bronzed #6 hooks and use those on the rigs. In the warmer summer water temperatures, use baby crawlers and put a half of one on each hook. Putting more than a half worm on each hook will just help you feed the fish. You will have to use minnows in the spring and fall when the water temps are below 60 - 65 degrees. Unless waves are higher than 2 feet, you should generally use 1/2 oz or 5/8 oz sinkers at the end of your rigs. It is very important to have the proper amount of line tension. The rising and falling waves should not lift the weight off the bottom, only the rogue larger waves should do that. We generally fish straight down from the boat or just off to the side. If you aren't getting hits, move around the boat to different spots before moving the boat to a new location. Sometimes the best action comes right along side the boat, other times you have to cast just off to one side. If you aren't getting steady action, then move around the weed clumps until you do.

If you are in the right spot, time of day shouldn't affect your perch catch that much. I typically start in the mid afternoon. When you have found your spot, you should be hitting everything from perch, smallmouth, sheephead (pesky but good fighters) to walleye and even pike or muskie. Don't expect to board the pike and muskie, since they are usually grabbing the perch and won't be hooked well. The walleye will come later in the day and you shouldn't have to move! On hazy days, you may see them as early as 4 pm, but usually the best action is from 6 pm to after dark. Make sure to adjust your drag so that there is play for the larger fish.

This method works for a simple reason: Perch are prey out there, and they like to have the cover of the weed beds to escape the predators. The predators are drawn to the weed beds to feed on the perch and other smaller fish. Drifting may land you a few rogue perch, but the schools will be found in the weeds.

The great thing about fishing this way is that it is so simple and can be easily taught to small children or newbie fishermen. Also, you won't waste a lot of gas trolling around. Frankly, I find trolling boring. I would much rather feel each and every bump and hit and set the hook myself.

If you are fishing in the souther part of the lake, the dumping grounds can be a good starting point, specifically the northern end. The St Clair Light produces sometimes and later in the summer the perch will be found closer to shore right out in front of the mile roads, I usually do best near 9 mile.

Good luck!
 
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