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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone give me some information on Formula powerboats (i.e. quality, resale value, recalls, ergonomics, power...etc)? Any information, good or bad, is greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

Marissa
 
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High quality, slightly more expensive than average on price. From what I have seen, the resale is good. Like any high end boat, if you keep it up to snuff it will keep it's value.

I think I contacted the web site and inquired about something on their boats and they sent me a couple catalogs and and a DVD promo video.
If I knew you I would let you borrow it. I just got a promo brochure and cd-rom in the mail last week on a special 4.99% finance deal they got going.
However, I did see some Formula's at the boat show aswell.
www.formulaboats.com
 

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I believe Formula builds a very hi quality production boat.

There fit & finish is also of hi quality.
standard power, mercruser.
and there hulls are very smooth, hi quality tooling producing these hulls / decks, and
put together with skillfull craftmanship, not 3 hr illegal aliens (such as other companies in fl, tx, ca)
Formula is a little more expensive say than a wellcraft, bayliner, four winns, crusers, ect..
but you see it in the quality.
I love the Formula 33 SS,... VERY NICE !
XO has a 33 ss with twin 496 ho in it, moves around 60 mph.
 

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What are your questions, specifically?
We have an '89 272 Formula with twin 454's. It's not the fastest boat for its size--top speed is ~ 65 mph. It's a heavy, sturdy boat that handles the LSC slop pretty well.

We bought it when it was 9 years old and have had to call Formula for answers to a couple of questions. They've always been helpful. My husband does most of the work and maintenance, so we haven't had to deal with a dealership.

We're looking to go bigger (and faster) and Formula tops our short list of boats to consider.

~Christine
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks to all who replied. The reason I ask is because I currently own a '93 290 Searay Sundancer (single screw 7.4L 454, 9 ft beam). This is my first boat. I am considering a new(er) boat and Formula has some awesome financing deals right now. Specifically, I was looking at the 27PC at the boat show. As far as features, it is pretty comparable to my Searay with the exception of the single screw on the Searay (twins on the 27PC)and less storage space but certainly enough for my needs. Would this 27PC handle a trip to PIB? Last Labor Day I took the Searay up to Port Huron and had no problem getting there, but on the return trip, coming out of the North Channel, there were so many boats coming out at the same time that I felt like I couldn't control the boat because the wakes from all the other boats were tossing me all over the place. I was scared to say the least. Perhaps my channel of choice was not the best, or the fact that I am a novice boater were reasons why I was not comfortable controlling my boat. More than likely, the latter. It wasn't a good feeling, nonetheless. Many people I met last year said that the Searay could handle Lake Erie, but after the North Channel incident, I would never attempt to take it to PIB.
This year, I would like to travel outside of LSC a little more. I guess my question is would the 27PC handle just about anything around here? I have heard how big the waves on Lakes Erie and Huron can be. Better yet, the question should be Is the problem the boat or the captain? Any advice??

Signed,

Inexperienced Boater
 

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Getting out of the north channel is always tricky!!
 
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Either of those boats will handle Lake Erie when conditions are favorable. We've done a PIB trip in a 21' Liberator before, but tried twice. The time we didn't make it we endured 10 miles of running straight into 4'-6' foot waves and turned back. We could barely stay on plane going into the waves, but ran 30 mph back surfing down them running downwind. Basically you really have to watch the weather. The time we did make it there in the 21', we had 1-3's all the way there, which wasn't too uncomfortable. We got there and paid for 2 nights dockage. The next day we listened to the VHF for the weather and they were predicting 25 kt sustained NE winds for the following day, waves 6-8'+. At that point, we decided to leave that afternoon and the lake was pretty smooth. Two years ago we did Cedar Point and the day we were supposed to leave, they called for 4-6's. Against better judgement, we headed out anyways to see if we could make PIB. It was hell. We took it slow, got soaked, and pulled in behind a 36' aft cabin who kind of smoothed it out for us. Every time he hit a big wave, we'd see spray come over the top of the canvas on his flybridge. Last year at Cedar Point, they forecasted 7-9' while we were there and we saw several 40'+ boats head out. After about 15 minutes or so, they were right back at the dock.

What does all of this mean? You have to watch the conditions and be prepared to change your plans if they get bad. I've heard of people getting stuck at PIB for a couple of days because they couldn't leave. From what I've seen, Erie is fine for anything 70% of the time. 15% it may be ok for 25' and over but you need to take it slower, and 15% of the time you just stay home (or at PIB if you're there already), no matter what size boat you have.

Now experience is another issue. Find a boating class. The Mt Clemens Power Squadron will have a Basic Boating class scheduled to start March 12. Chapman's Piloting is a great book on boating and seamanship that has a ton of information. I don't know how inexperienced you are, but if you don't know them, you should learn the rules of the road, basically who has the right of way in different situations. Knowing them can make the craziness of LSC more tolerable. You'll be more comfortable when you encounter a busy North Channel or Metro Beach entrance when you know what you are supposed to do, even when others don't. Ok, I'm tired of typing now...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My experience is pretty limited. I just bought the Searay last April, so summer 2002 was my first boating experience as a "captain". I took the US Coast Guard's Boat Smart class which taught all the basics (i.e. right of way, navigation lights, waterway systems...etc.). It was very useful. However, in my situation, it sounds like conditions and experience are the bottom line.
Thanks!
 
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Marissa

If you are a woman, and I think you are? I applaud you. There are not very many "woman captains" out there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks, Convincor253.

Yes, I am a woman. Summer of 2001, my friend and I were out on the Lake all summer on jets skis. I decided to upgrade to a boat in 2002. I've been hooked ever since......
 

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Welcome aboard Marissa, you have a wealth of knowledge at your finger tips. I captained a 29 Formula Cruiser w/twins I/O all last year, thought it was one of the best built boats I've experienced. Good luck in your decision.
 
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