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Alright I may catch slak for this but I wanted to share my opinion. I love perch fishing more than any other kind of fishing and St. Clair is one of the best spots. Now I know that everyone wants to catch that monster perch with lots of girth. Now if you take notice when you filet your catch the ones with the huge bellys are full of eggs. So, I would suguest to you all that with modern technology and the number of camera phones out there, take pictures of that jumbo with the swolen bellys and release them. This way we can ensure a large perch population in the future.
 

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Yes! In before the lock!

I let the big (12"+) females go - not because I am worried about the population, but because they are like trying to fillet an old truck tire.
 

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It is my belief that the bass, pike and musky do far more damage to the population than the fishermen. You cant believe all the perch in the lake are only in the areas where ice fishermen fish. The larger ones are the smarter ones by experience. They barely bite if at all. Fish are meant to be eaten. I just wish the people that freeze and kill dinks would realize they are the future, not to be discarded on ice.
 

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Yes, fish are meant to be eaten, and we probably are the lowest predator on the food chain when it comes to impacting the population. However, there is no mistaking it when you've got a big female perch jam packed with eggs. They look impressive and "huge", but there really is no more meat there than on a similar sized male. She has a job to do, and I agree with practicing a little selective harvest by letting her go give it a shot.
 

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The fry are food for other fish also. But as Capt.Doug says.
h2o
 

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That's a big IF. I haven't seen too many jumbos this year. IF I catch a big one she's coming home with me. Even the 7 inchers lay eggs, so there are plenty of breeding fish out there. I kind of agree with littleguy that the big ones are a little nastier, but how many do we usually catch anyway? If you want to let yours go then go for it, but we've been keeping big ones forever without a problem.
 
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Heres some butter for that popcorn

You say "been keeping them forever without a problem" but I disagree with you and when you say that it reminds me of the gill netters mentallity.
There an obvious decline in perch population and size, if you knew anything about over harvesting and our oceans youd know thats the sighn of too much fishing pressure by humans, Id bet the farm that if perch were off limits to human harvest for a few years that we would see more and larger perch and likeley would have our own "Lk Simcoe" right here in our own back yard.

IMO there is a problem with perch populations becouse perch fisherman dont practise catch and release nor do they have or observe any kind of size limit plus the internet helps peaple stay on the fish and promotes more peaple to go fishing when a good bite is posted.

100 people a day keeping 25 perch is 2500 perch a day KILLED, 17.500 perch per week KILLED, 75000 perch per a month KILLED! thats pretty easy and conservative math.

The Oceans have proved several of times over that humans consume way more of the resource than the food chain does and were just a lake with not many places for the fish to hide from and replenish areas with....WAKE UP PEOPLE!
 

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My vote is with a little selective harvest. I am a CPR guy so 99.9% of my catch goes back in anyway. If you keep everything within law it is your right, whether I or anybody agrees with it or not.

I guess what I'm saying is it's a personal decision, I would put the larger pregos back in though.
 

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I may be wrong, but in my opinion with so many dinks you ice people are complaining
about, there are plenty of perch out there, maybe to many for the food chain, and they
can't get big. I fish perch on soft water, I keep anything larger than 8 1/2 " , either
on St. Clair or Erie. When fishing Erie, 4 guys and we bring home 200 perch, and we
probably throw back 200 to 300 dinks. So what i'm seeing is not a problem of not enough
perch.
 

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The rules and regulations are there for a reason, plenty of though and research has gone into the limits, size, etc... there is a reason why you can only harvest 1 sturgeon per season. Yes at one time, they were plentiful, but due to overfishing, the stock has been depleted. Obviously the breeding habits of sturgeon are different than say perch or crappie. Best example is the blue walleye which went extinct in the 1980's. They used to make up 50% of the commercial catch in Lake Erie, and Lake Ontario, but due to several factors, including overfishing, they are now extinct. DNR keeps a close eye on the numbers, and I'm sure that if a certain fish population like yellow perch was in danger, they would definitely put stricter limits on it. I suggest that if you have a problem with a certain population's numbers, that people start sending reports to the DNR and maybe they can do a study, but besides that, it's pretty much a dead issue. Killing musky, pike, bass, or whatever in an attempt to "save the fish" is the wrong way of thinking. I've never heard of a species disappearing from natural causes (ICE AGE DOESNT COUNT). Most species that go extinct are due to man making them extinct.
 

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QUOTE(b_radici @ Feb 7 2010, 02:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The rules and regulations are there for a reason, plenty of though and research has gone into the limits, size, etc... there is a reason why you can only harvest 1 sturgeon per season. Yes at one time, they were plentiful, but due to overfishing, the stock has been depleted. Obviously the breeding habits of sturgeon are different than say perch or crappie. Best example is the blue walleye which went extinct in the 1980's. They used to make up 50% of the commercial catch in Lake Erie, and Lake Ontario, but due to several factors, including overfishing, they are now extinct. DNR keeps a close eye on the numbers, and I'm sure that if a certain fish population like yellow perch was in danger, they would definitely put stricter limits on it. I suggest that if you have a problem with a certain population's numbers, that people start sending reports to the DNR and maybe they can do a study, but besides that, it's pretty much a dead issue. Killing musky, pike, bass, or whatever in an attempt to "save the fish" is the wrong way of thinking. I've never heard of a species disappearing from natural causes (ICE AGE DOESNT COUNT). Most species that go extinct are due to man making them extinct.

Well said sir.

I agree...if its OK by DNR then fish on.
 

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QUOTE(b_radici @ Feb 7 2010, 02:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The rules and regulations are there for a reason, plenty of though and research has gone into the limits, size, etc... there is a reason why you can only harvest 1 sturgeon per season. Yes at one time, they were plentiful, but due to overfishing, the stock has been depleted. Obviously the breeding habits of sturgeon are different than say perch or crappie. Best example is the blue walleye which went extinct in the 1980's. They used to make up 50% of the commercial catch in Lake Erie, and Lake Ontario, but due to several factors, including overfishing, they are now extinct. DNR keeps a close eye on the numbers, and I'm sure that if a certain fish population like yellow perch was in danger, they would definitely put stricter limits on it. I suggest that if you have a problem with a certain population's numbers, that people start sending reports to the DNR and maybe they can do a study, but besides that, it's pretty much a dead issue. Killing musky, pike, bass, or whatever in an attempt to "save the fish" is the wrong way of thinking. I've never heard of a species disappearing from natural causes (ICE AGE DOESNT COUNT). Most species that go extinct are due to man making them extinct.
Good Point. And I agree totally.
 

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Hi folks,this is a topic that I have wanted to start as well for some time.I also will have to side with Fish-on .I have had some success this winter and i'll tell ya lifting those 11s,12s and 13,s out of the hole is a real blast and I find my self at times laughing like a little girl after a successful catch.Seeing them dwarf your other fish,showing off to my buds.However I have to admit that when it comes time to clean those jumbies I am asking myself why I harvested this 10 yr old perch that has less meat than a 8" male and whose huge egg sack would be better off in the lake than in my garbage can.Im sure many of the fishermen on this site feel as i do.Not trying to preach or dictate,just my opinion.I feel much better releasing ANY large prespawn fish.
 

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Seems like there are tons of perch in LSC from all the reports of sorting that goes on to get a few over 8 inches. A 12" fish has likely spawned 4 or 5 times already in the lake and done it's job contributing to the population. I would agree that if there were a problem the DNR would step in and impose a limit like they did in lake michigan and now the perch population has made a decent comeback. It is not the regular fisherman the does the damage, it is the commercial fishermen. You should be more worried about the netters from the reservation as they likely do more damage than all hook and line fisherman combined.
 
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