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FYI

Special Edition: Gasoline Emissions Update - New Boat Sales
Attention: Sales Personnel
Dear Volvo Penta Dealer:

New U.S. EPA emissions regulations on engines manufactured after January 1, 2010, take effect starting January. These regulations include new legal requirements that affect the entire boating industry, including you. This Special Edition of the Volvo Penta Dealer Newswire focuses on what you need to know about the impact of emissions regulations on your new boat sales.

As a gasoline powered engine manufacturer, Volvo Penta currently complies with two separate sets of regulations in the US: California (CARB) and US EPA. The laws are different, and we will address them separately in this Special Edition. Before we start, though, two factors are important to understand:
The regulations focus on the calendar year of engine manufacture, not boat model year or sale date.
The regulations put the initial legal obligation of compliance on the engine manufacturer. However, if an investigation is commenced and the engine manufacturer can show that it did everything in its control to meet the requirements, the investigator's focus will turn to the boat builder and its dealers. Therefore, everyone in the distribution chain needs to understand the regulations and their legal obligations.
Remember, that everything currently in your gasoline engine inventory is legal to sell now and going forward. The focus of this newsletter (and regulations) are new engines manufactured after January 1, 2010.

California Air Resources Board (CARB)

The most recent regulations for stern drive engines from the California Air Resource Board (CARB) have been in effect since January 1, 2008. These regulations require every stern drive engine sold for registration in the State of California to be equipped with a catalyst, with one exception: the General Motors discontinued engine blocks. Under the regulations, stern drive manufacturers have the option to select either the 4.3 or the 8.1 to sell on a limited basis without a catalyst. (Volvo Penta has selected the 4.3; the 8.1 is available only with a catalyst) A "limited basis" means that the engine manufacturer must still meet corporate fleet averaging requirements. So, in the State of California, Volvo Penta must constantly monitor the ratio of 4.3s to the other engines sold. If too many 4.3s are sold in relation to the catalyzed engines, we will stop sales to builders until the balance is once again achieved. For the 2010 calendar year, the CARB regulations continue in place.

What You Need to Know and Do to Sell Legally in California

CARB regulations apply only to engines sold for registration in the State of California. If you are a California dealer (or are selling to a California resident for registration in California), inspect your shipment of boats, and look for the special "Star" labels. Only 3-star (4.3 Liter) and 4-star (catalyzed) engines marked with California Emission Control can be sold for registration in California.

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California dealers should NOT accept boats with this tag:

US EPA Regulations

The new US EPA stern drive regulations go into effect on January 1, 2010. These regulations require catalysts on all engines manufactured after January 1, 2010 except the GM discontinued 4.3 and 8.1 blocks. The US EPA regulations also allow corporate averaging, banking and trading. (Unlike California, EPA will not average the 4.3 and 8.1 emissions into the fleet average requirements until the 2011 calendar year.) The 4.3 (without catalyst) and the 8.1 (with and without catalyst) models will be available as today. The 4.3 and 8.1 liter engines--even those equipped with catalysts--are considered "exempt" and will have this label:

To meet our corporate average requirements, all Volvo Penta small block (5.0 and 5.7 liter) V8 engines must be catalyzed. Every non-exempt, EPA compliant Volvo Penta engine will have an emissions control label listing the date of manufacture on the engine body:

(Engines that meet both CARB and US EPA regulations will have two emission control labels.)

The EPA Emissions Control Information tag will clearly identify those engines manufactured after January 1, 2010, and which are subject to the new EPA rules.

Just like in California, "going into effect" means that engines manufactured after January 1, 2010, must meet the regulations. These regulations do not address when the boat is manufactured. US EPA recognizes that a manufacturer's inventory does not necessarily change over on a day certain. Therefore, we expect US EPA to use a flexibility rule similar to that incorporated by CARB, allowing a boat builder to use engines manufactured prior to January 1, 2010, in 2010 model year hulls. So long as a non-compliant engine is built prior to January 1, 2010, it may be sold in a 2010 boat model year hull.
Canadian Update

Despite its best efforts to have emissions regulations identical to US EPA in place by 2010, Environment Canada (the US EPA counterpart) was unsuccessful in getting its regulatory process completed in time. Nevertheless, NMMA Canada and all of the engine manufacturers are working with Environment Canada to complete a Memorandum of Understanding to ensure that engines sold into Canada meet US EPA requirements. Volvo Penta actively supports this process in order to attain environmental goals and to reduce the risks of non-compliant engines re-entering the US and creating liability issues for Volvo Penta and our OEM and dealer customers. Until the Memorandum of Understanding is completed, export engines will also be available in the Canadian market. Stay tuned for more information.

Rest of the World (Export)

New emissions regulations for the major export markets such as Europe and Australia are still several years away. The new US EPA regulations offer an option to placard a non EPA compliant engine with a label that says "For Export Only."

If you receive an engine marked with this label, it is not legal for sale in the United States. Contact your OEM immediately for instructions on how to deal with the boat.

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Volvo Penta supports the new emissions regulations and their goal of a cleaner environment. However, we understand that these US EPA changes increase our collective workloads and liabilities. We will work to minimize the burdens to our dealers and customers, where possible, within the new regulatory structure.

Questions?

If you have questions regarding engine emissions regulations, please email us at [email protected]

Sincerely,

The Partner Network Team
 

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its been coming for years.

outboards have been hit with CARB Energy Star Ratings for at least 6 years now. Not sure of the exact date it started.

Worse yet it is California that all but banned two strokes from water supply lakes. California added MTBE to gasoline a few years prior.....then they didnt like that it was getting into the drinking water.....so they banned two stroke outboards. Now why didnt they just remove the MTBE????
 

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QUOTE(Mini @ Dec 15 2009, 01:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>its been coming for years.

outboards have been hit with CARB Energy Star Ratings for at least 6 years now. Not sure of the exact date it started.

Worse yet it is California that all but banned two strokes from water supply lakes. California added MTBE to gasoline a few years prior.....then they didnt like that it was getting into the drinking water.....so they banned two stroke outboards. Now why didnt they just remove the MTBE????
How's it go...

The more the plans fail, the more the planers plan.
 

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It adds quite a bit to the cost of a diesel vehicle.
As part of our city's yearly budget, they purchase a new fire truck every year to replace the oldest one in their fleet. The cost of a 2009 vs a 2010 was so significant, city counsel provided the funds to purchase 2-2009 trucks. I forget the savings amount, but it was enough to buy a new mid sized car....for each truck purchace. 20k+
 

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QUOTE(Away Point @ Dec 15 2009, 06:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(Mini @ Dec 15 2009, 01:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>its been coming for years.

outboards have been hit with CARB Energy Star Ratings for at least 6 years now. Not sure of the exact date it started.

Worse yet it is California that all but banned two strokes from water supply lakes. California added MTBE to gasoline a few years prior.....then they didnt like that it was getting into the drinking water.....so they banned two stroke outboards. Now why didnt they just remove the MTBE????
How's it go...

The more the plans fail, the more the planers plan.



AP, you know i'm generally not in favor of any new government regulation, but this is one I can get behind. Given what boats cost, manufacturers should have been offering these options for years. Life cycle cost with these new engines will be lower and reliability will be higher. The upfront cost is the only issue, and given what most boats cost nowadays, even if this were offered as an option it would be a no-brainer to an informed buyer.

Catalysts require better engine control. Better engine control means more efficiency and less wear. Newer engines, if they continue to phase out the old GM big-blocks and small blocks in favor of modern designs like the LS-based GM small blocks, will offer even better improvements in efficiency and reliability.

I don't know the specifics on all of these new 2010 engines, but I read a bit about an Indmar 350 V8 that was offered with a catalyst beginning a few years ago. The catalyst requires the use of a closed-loop fuel injection system. The exhaust was also redesigned to house the catalyst without any extra restriction. When compared to the same engine without the catalysts system and with an open loop fuel injection system (ie: the crap mercruiser uses), the boat with the catalytic converter was way, way, WAY more efficient at idle (something rediculous like 70% more efficient) all the way down to something like 8% more efficient at WOT. That's with the same crappy old head and block design that GM has used forever. That increased efficiency also translates into less excess fuel washing down the cylinder walls and getting into the oil - which equals longer engine life, less blow-by, and longer oil life. It's like a win-win-win.

And absent some kind of regulation, it's clear that the boat engine manufacturers would be happy to continue to sell us 1960's technology in our brand new quarter-million-dollar boats. This is one area where consumers may care, but just aren't offered the choice.

In the end, this will be good for consumers. It will, to an extent, finally do for boats what fuel injection has done for cars over the last 20 years or so.
 

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QUOTE(3crabs @ Dec 15 2009, 08:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>It adds quite a bit to the cost of a diesel vehicle.
As part of our city's yearly budget, they purchase a new fire truck every year to replace the oldest one in their fleet. The cost of a 2009 vs a 2010 was so significant, city counsel provided the funds to purchase 2-2009 trucks. I forget the savings amount, but it was enough to buy a new mid sized car....for each truck purchace. 20k+

The new regulations for diesel cars and trucks are as bad as the new rules for marine engines are good, IMO. Moreso, even.

They are past the point of good return on investment on new trucks. They are chasing emissions goals at the EXPENSE of efficiency. I'm all for cleaning up where possible, within reason, but the cost of the hardware, the hit to efficiency, and the negligable (if even measurable) effect on the environment just don't add up for those new diesel standards.
 

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QUOTE(sleeper @ Dec 16 2009, 08:51 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(Away Point @ Dec 15 2009, 06:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(Mini @ Dec 15 2009, 01:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>its been coming for years.

outboards have been hit with CARB Energy Star Ratings for at least 6 years now. Not sure of the exact date it started.

Worse yet it is California that all but banned two strokes from water supply lakes. California added MTBE to gasoline a few years prior.....then they didnt like that it was getting into the drinking water.....so they banned two stroke outboards. Now why didnt they just remove the MTBE????
How's it go...

The more the plans fail, the more the planers plan.



AP, you know i'm generally not in favor of any new government regulation, but this is one I can get behind. Given what boats cost, manufacturers should have been offering these options for years. Life cycle cost with these new engines will be lower and reliability will be higher. The upfront cost is the only issue, and given what most boats cost nowadays, even if this were offered as an option it would be a no-brainer to an informed buyer.

In the end, this will be good for consumers. It will, to an extent, finally do for boats what fuel injection has done for cars over the last 20 years or so.


While I agree once implemented it will be good for the consumer except for maintanence. Problem is the cost of implementation. Marine Engine companies (sans Merc or Volvo) are not as big as automotive companies. The initial R&D, testing, verification and validation costs are pretty staggering. We were going through initial testing on catalytic converters when I was at Crusader in the mid 90's and the size of the company and limited budgets for the above programs were detrimental in bringing the technology to market. So I guess it is if you cannot afford to compete, you will suffer from Govt imposed regulations that will drive you out of the market place....not a very fair playing field. Also if I do rememebr the additional heat stored in the converters were not very good for other components in a closed (bilge) enviroment....so other components had to be changed/researched and developed along with this. A car is not a boat and visa versa. Completely different animals that utilize very similar powerplants.

But I do agree that it is a VERY good thing for the consumer (except the price increase passed on for the implementation) and an even better for the enviroment.
 
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