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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just wanted to know some peoples opinions and what they are doing about the whole lawsuit battle going on for sharing of downloaded music.

I just read that they sued a 12 year old girl in NY... they settled for $2,000.... how sick is that?
 

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If the record companies wanted more people to BUY the music, they wouldn't put out such CRAP!! There wasn't ONE good song during the entire Video Music Awards a couple weeks ago.

MTV and radio stations force onto us what THEY feel we should listen too, which the record companies pay THEM to play and push. All these crappy Creed and Nickelback and Stained wannabes just SUCK!

If it wasn't for the internet and downloading music, I wouldn't even know that most of the bands I listen to exist. If I like it enough, I buy it. If not I DELETE it!


When I went and saw Iron Maiden a few weeks ago, they were getting ready to perform a new song from their upcoming CD, and Bruce Dickinson actually encourged people to get out their recorders, put the song online and share it. He stated that they don't care since they've never had a problem with CD sales.

He also started ragging on the record companies stating that if they wanted people to BUY CDs rather than download the music, they wouldn't put out such CRAP!! (So at least I knew I wasn't the only one that felt that way).
 

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What ever happened to the art being in existence for the arts sake? True artists should be happy people want to listen or try out their music and not worry about the cash behind it.
 

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I am a supporter of shared music, but why go after a 12 year old girl and not the individual(s) that actually created the software such as Kazaa? Wouldn't that make better sense?

Just letting the whole thing go, would make more sense! If I like most songs on CD I am buying it anyhow. But sharing the music lets me do a trial run.
 

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shared music RULES
the bureocrats SUCK
 

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We also download music and enjoy it. I can't stand spending good money on a whole CD for one good song. I used to make mix tapes all the time when I was younger, but I guess when it comes down to it, it is copyright infringement and musicians work hard for their millions.

Bottom of the line, its the law....If you don't like it, start doing something about it. Contact your senator or state representative.

Another thing, all the clear channel radio stations just play the same songs over and over again. If I have to hear that Beyonce song again I am going to throw up. I used to like it until I had to hear it 5 times a day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
QUOTE(surfergirlck @ Sep 11 2003, 07:51 AM)shared music RULES
the bureocrats SUCK

You got the right idea surfergirl!!!
 

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Notice it is the record companies...not the artist!

Many artists support the web.

I deleted everything...A lawsuit is the last thing I need right now. <_<
 

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Okay, I'm confused as to why they are suing???
If you download a song are you safe to do so???
And while you are downloading a song if you allow someone to download a song from your directory is that when they are suing ???? Only if you share your songs with others???
 

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QUOTE(MONEYSHOT @ Sep 11 2003, 09:03 AM)Another thing, all the clear channel radio stations just play the same songs over and over again. If I have to hear that Beyonce song again I am going to throw up. I used to like it until I had to hear it 5 times a day. [/SIZE][/color][/font]
No doubt! They cram the same music down our throats every hour and it drives me batty.
I like the music, but give it a rest. There is a lot of great music from past years, play it!
 

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QUOTE(The Perfect Fit @ Sep 11 2003, 09:47 AM)Okay, I'm confused as to why they are suing???
If you download a song are you safe to do so???
And while you are downloading a song if you allow someone to download a song from your directory is that when they are suing ???? Only if you share your songs with others???
I am also confused.


What happens when I copy music from my own cd collection?

If they some how get into my hard drive how do they know that I acually stole it and didn't just copy it from my all ready paid for collection?

Am I going to be sued when I share it with someone else? Maybe they are just listening to it with no intention of keeping it on their hard drive. That's no different than listening to it with me in my car or house.

When I down load music to my hard drive, if I like it I will go buy the cd. The less crap and less "one hit wonders" that record companies and artists put out on cd's then the more likely I am to by.

Know what I mean?
 

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Top Gun,
many of the MP3s acquired from Kaaza or whatever usually have some sort of signature that can match it to other files on the net.
The most simple being the ID tags that are embedded in the MP3 files... which contain artist, album, track, etc.
often, the comment tag might have some text in there like "brought to you by Muzik Gangsta"
I'm not sure exactly how they match the signatures, but that would be an easy way to check them... they probably can match the encoded music pretty easily too.

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most real bands that have been around probably don't have issues with sharing. they have a good fan base... and they make tons-o-cash touring year after year.

I think its the top 40, "We'll be gone next year", musicians if you can call them that, get pimped by sharing the most. they usually only have 1 good song and if you buy the CD you'll be ashamed to own it in 2 years.
 

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How the RIAA catches file swappers

The Recording Industry Association of America sued 261 alleged file swappers Monday, launching a legal campaign against ordinary Internet users that could ultimately result in thousands of additional lawsuits.
But are you at risk?

If you or a family member have used Kazaa or any other file-swapping application recently and have left your computer open to the Net, the answer is possibly--although the odds of being singled out among an estimated 60 million people using peer-to-peer software remain small. If you've kept thousands of songs in the file you're sharing with other file swappers, then the odds are a little better, though still slim.

Here's a quick look at how the RIAA has done its investigations and what kind of information it has used to find people and file Monday's lawsuits.

Step one: Finding file-traders isn't hard. Anybody who opens a shared folder on Kazaa, Morpheus or any other file-swapping network is susceptible to potentially prying eyes.

In the most recent wave of investigations, the RIAA has used automated tools that look for a relatively short list of files. When it finds a person sharing one or more of those files, it downloads all or many of them for verification purposes. A complete list of these target files is not available, but a sampling of files cited in the early lawsuits includes the following artists and songs:

• Bobby McFerrin, "Don't Worry, Be Happy"
• Thompson Twins, "Hold Me Now"
• Eagles, "Hotel California"
• George Michael, "Kissing A Fool"
• Paula Abdul, "Knocked Out"
• Green Day, "Minority"
• UB40, "Red Red Wine"
• Ludacris "Area Codes"
• Marvin Gaye, "Sexual Healing"
• Avril Lavigne, "Complicated"

This is far from a complete list, but if you've downloaded and shared any of those songs recently, you may be at greater risk of finding your way onto the RIAA's list.

Step two: The RIAA uses features within Kazaa, Grokster and some other software programs to list all the files available within a person's shared folder and takes screenshots of that information. As filed in court, that provides a record of what in some cases has been thousands of songs shared at once.

Step three: The RIAA's software records the Internet address associated with a computer that is sharing one of the copyrighted songs the organization is investigating. Some file-swapping programs try to hide this by using mechanisms such as proxy servers, but most downloads still expose this information.

Step four: According to information filed as part of a related lawsuit, the RIAA also has the ability to do a more sophisticated analysis of the files that have been downloaded. The group checks the artist's name, title, and any "metadata" information attached to the files, looking for information that may indicate what piece of software has been used to create the file or any other. Some files swapped widely on the Net include messages from the original person who created the MP3 file, such as "Created by Grip" or "Finally the Real Full CD delivered fresh for everyone on Grokster and Kazaa to Enjoy!"

The RIAA has also analyzed in detail some files' contents. The trade group has databases of digital fingerprints, or "hashes," that identify songs that were swapped online in Napster's heyday. Investigators check these fingerprints against those found in a new suspected file swapper's folder, looking for matches. A match means the file has almost certainly been downloaded from the Net, likely from a stream of copies dating back to the original Napster file.

Step five: The RIAA files a subpoena request with a federal court. The subpoena allows the group to go to an Internet service provider and request the name and address of the subscriber who's associated with the Net address that was used to swap files. A few Internet service providers (ISPs) have fought back against these requests, but most have been forced to comply with the RIAA's request.

Many ISPs notify their subscribers when a subpoena comes in that targets their information. The Electronic Frontier Foundation has set up a database that allows people to see whether their online screen name has been the target of one of these subpoenas.

The RIAA said it has filed more than 1,500 of these subpoenas to date.

Step six: Once the identity of the ISP subscriber has been exposed, the RIAA puts together all the information gleaned through the earlier technical investigation and files a lawsuit. In earlier cases, it has accepted settlement agreements that range between $12,000 and $17,000. In this case, it has accepted some settlement agreements for as little as $3,000.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Here is a very helpful site with much information about the actions of the RIAA.

http://www.eff.org/

There is a search engine on it that tells you if your IP address or User name has been targeted for legal action.

Check it out.
 

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If I download something then record it to a cd and erase it from my hard drive, can I still be caught after I've erased it?
 

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QUOTE(Top Gun @ Sep 12 2003, 06:41 AM)If I download something then record it to a cd and erase it from my hard drive, can I still be caught after I've erased it?

That's not how it works. Didn't you read above?
 

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The way that I read this is that if your SHARING your mp3 songs with others, that's the person that their looking to sue... If you get on-line and download songs to your directory but you don't share any of your songs with others, then your probably pretty safe??? Does that sound right to anyone reading this thread????
 
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