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QUOTE(bassnbrian @ Feb 9 2010, 09:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(Bwana Don @ Feb 9 2010, 08:44 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>http://www.in-fisherman.com/content/smallmouths-tomorrow

I didn't realize the cormorants were so voracious.

have seen some small groups of them on LSC. Watched them go under for loooong periods of time and surface a long distance away from where they submerged.

not good.


I've read that up around the eastern up, they are wiping out the perch population. Fisherman are up in arms about it. I could be off on the location but that general area.
 

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They are possibly the worst of the invasives....they just plain eat. Smallmouth, perch, just about any fish up to 14" long and possibly longer.

They have secimated areas of the great lakes and other bodies of water. Not only from eating fish but from the acidity in their feces. The charity islands on Saginaw bay are almost devoid of vegetation from their poop.

Nasty birds and we should be allowed to control their population.

With all that said, I personally dont think the numbers are as bad on St Clair as they were say just 5 years ago.....
 

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QUOTE(Bwana Don @ Feb 9 2010, 11:06 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>More info;
http://www.mlive.com/news/bay-city/index.s...bctimescom.html

Are they invasive, or indigenous to Michigan?

They are 50/50. They are a migratory bird, but traditionally a saltwater bird. But when enough get blown up here and breed they instinctivaly remember to come back here, and the cycle begins. The feds gave the DNR more grounds to "controll" this breed by upping the yearly cull by 10,000 birds I believe.
 

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I say keep the sumabitches around, here's from wikipedia:

Humans have historically exploited cormorants' fishing skills, in China, Japan, and Macedonia, where they have been trained by fishermen. A snare is tied near the base of the bird's throat, which allows the bird only to swallow small fish. When the bird captures and tries to swallow a large fish, the fish is caught in the bird's throat. When the bird returns to the fisherman's raft, the fisherman helps the bird to remove the fish from its throat. The method is not as common today, since more efficient methods of catching fish have been developed.

If you see me out there with a bird tied to a string, just keep on going.....
 

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QUOTE(b_radici @ Feb 9 2010, 02:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I say keep the sumabitches around, here's from wikipedia:

Humans have historically exploited cormorants' fishing skills, in China, Japan, and Macedonia, where they have been trained by fishermen. A snare is tied near the base of the bird's throat, which allows the bird only to swallow small fish. When the bird captures and tries to swallow a large fish, the fish is caught in the bird's throat. When the bird returns to the fisherman's raft, the fisherman helps the bird to remove the fish from its throat. The method is not as common today, since more efficient methods of catching fish have been developed.

If you see me out there with a bird tied to a string, just keep on going.....


I read that too....chuckled at the thought. Wonder what the DNR would say about that!!!! lol

"No officer I am not fishing, I am taking my bird for a swim!"
 
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