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Ive got some video of that one passing, I stopped on the side road to get a view of it. Then I stopped in downtown Algonac and got some good shots of the USCG one that was making passes. I'll share later tonight.
 

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The Canadian cutter Samuel Risley is repaired and has been working the river along with the Griffon, seen here. Risley was tied up in Sarnia with some sort of breakdown during the ice jam that TCG filmed a couple weeks ago.

Shipping is pretty much done. It's largely ice pressure and flooding relief now.
 

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can you just imagine the power of the water flowing once they break that ice jam up? Your gonna see the lake lift that day.
 

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Here are some clips of the cutters working today. The beginning shows how much the water fell because of the ice jam, this is further downstream on the North Channel. The Griffon is shown in the beginning, and then the rest is the Bristol Bay working in front of the Algonac boardwalk with a nice shot of another Canadian cutter coming up the S. Channel. Sorry for the shaky camera hand...


 

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I wonder.....

Don't you all think if we didn't use ice breakers and freighters in the great lakes, do you think we wouldn't have an much of a problem with low water levels? I would think that if there were no water traffic in the winter between ice jams and typical facts that the lake would freeze over solid. The frozen lake would act as somewhat of a barrier or water dam if you will. Not allowing as much water to pass through Lake St. Clair. Resulting in higher levels in the spring and summer because this barrier would block water flow causing more water to freeze even more up north as well.

Just a thought I have had for a while. I wonder if there are any expert theories that back this possibility?
 

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QUOTE(Convincor @ Feb 11 2010, 09:04 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I wonder.....

Don't you all think if we didn't use ice breakers and freighters in the great lakes, do you think we wouldn't have an much of a problem with low water levels? I would think that if there were no water traffic in the winter between ice jams and typical facts that the lake would freeze over solid. The frozen lake would act as somewhat of a barrier or water dam if you will. Not allowing as much water to pass through Lake St. Clair. Resulting in higher levels in the spring and summer because this barrier would block water flow causing more water to freeze even more up north as well.

Just a thought I have had for a while. I wonder if there are any expert theories that back this possibility?

If it was a barrier, wouldn't Niagara Falls dry up?
 

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QUOTE(Convincor @ Feb 11 2010, 09:04 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I wonder.....

Don't you all think if we didn't use ice breakers and freighters in the great lakes, do you think we wouldn't have an much of a problem with low water levels? I would think that if there were no water traffic in the winter between ice jams and typical facts that the lake would freeze over solid. The frozen lake would act as somewhat of a barrier or water dam if you will. Not allowing as much water to pass through Lake St. Clair. Resulting in higher levels in the spring and summer because this barrier would block water flow causing more water to freeze even more up north as well.

Just a thought I have had for a while. I wonder if there are any expert theories that back this possibility?


Interesting.

I have no idea what I am talking about, but if the water was blocked it would stay in Huron which doesnt freeze. Wouldnt we rather have it in LSC which does freeze to prevent it from evaporating??

Just a thought....
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
the problem they are having this year is the ice pack,, as it packs it has no where
to go and starts to pack down to the bottom of the river creating a dam in which no water flows
all up stream communities are in real danger of flooding
this happend real bad in the 80s,, i remember the salt river was completely dry
at buds in fair haven you could walk out over a mile... you would be suprised of all the crap in the bottom of the salt river ....
 

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Bill I dont know if you realize how much water flows through our lake. Dont forget that St Clair gets "flushed" on average in 7 days. Depending on the current flow and winds....sometimes as quick as 2 days, other times as long as 30 days.
 

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She's was packed all the way to Sarnia, but there is a section south of St. Clair and down that's looking clear. Oddly, I saw couple of Algo-Ship/Tankers heading downriver with the Griffon as an escort at about 9:00 this AM.
 

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QUOTE(Roxy @ Feb 11 2010, 01:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>She's was packed all the way to Sarnia, but there is a section south of St. Clair and down that's looking clear. Oddly, I saw couple of Algo-Ship/Tankers heading downriver with the Griffon as an escort at about 9:00 this AM.

The tankers are about all that will move now until the shipping season starts. They move things like heating oil or gasoline, etc, with the refineries up in Sarnia.

The Soo opens March 15, so the first activity for the rest of the fleet will be timed to hit that start date.
 
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