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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There are a lot of articles that talk about fishing for bass with jigging spoons. I don't even own a jigging spoon. I've been thinking about picking up a few for the upcoming season to do a little experimenting. I would really appreciate some input to the following questions:

Do they work on St. Clair or Erie? I was planing on trying them later in the morning on Erie when the fish suspend in deeper water off the reefs.

What weight would you suggest? I was thinking 1/2 to 3/4oz.

What is the shallowest you can fish a jigging spoon? I was going to try them in 25 to 30ft of water.

Any help would be great!
 

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They are one of the most underated lures out there. I would say that LSCN member Dave Reault is the local expert on them. Maybe he can give up some tips.....
 

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I have always heard that jigging spoons are most effective in cold water, especially the late fall. I've mainly heard that they're best on ledges and drops near deep water for suspended fish.
 

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I've been using jigging spoons for the past 15 years.
To get the hang of it, go someplace like the north channel and
jig the drop-offs along the channel edges. Use a medium heavy 5.5 foot rod with a baitcaster.

The action that you impart should be quick snaps with the rod tip, then follow the bait back down with your rod tip until the bait hits the bottom and repeat the process.

The key here is to keep your line verticle just like you would if you were jigging for walleye in the Detoit River.

I rarely jig in the lake,mostly in current area's but might have to give it a try next year.

Good Luck
 

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i like jigging spoons on st clair.

when its hot and its mid day, the fish will often suspend around the channels.

i can drop a spoon down in 12-18 ft of water and catch some nice smallies.

usually tho, i use a slower presentation. rather than jerking the rod tip up, i simply raise the rod tip up.

the biggest thing in my opinion to remember about spoons is never let them fall on a slack line. always follow the lure down with your rod tip.

spoons are an excellent way to catch bass, and i will agree that are way overlooked. but they catch fish, and they have been for decades.

madman himself
 

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Here's a Ripley for you. I have caught hundreds of Pike, Bass, Walleye and Muskie Jigging a Red Eye through the ice. Also Dog Fish and Channel Cats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the help guys. KEEP IT COMING!

How does the hit feel or do you even feel it? Or is it one of those instinct things where it feels different and you see the line go a little slack?

Is the 1/2 and 3/4oz okay? Do you recommend a certain type of spoon or manufacturer?

I'll tell you what! Once again, Thank You Mini. This forum is excellent! It's filled with great information and great people.

It sure helps get us through the winter.

Thanks Again!
 

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You should have no problem feeling the bite. They usually slam them pretty good when they do. Most of the hits I've experienced have come just as it you are about to pull up for another jig. Plus as pointed out earlier you should always have a tight line (even on the down stroke) and you shouldn't be on the bottom so you've got direct contact with the fish.
 

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Other than walleye fishing in the spring and the perch jigs in the winter I know my jigging experience is extremely limited. How about a few brand names and weights that have proven themselves from you guys that have had some success with the technique? I hate to have to shell out $50 in spoons to find out which ones work or don't. Thanks.
 
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