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My old Gander Mountain Advantage (that was based on a St. Croix blank) bit the dust last fall when it got caught in a boat cleat when I grabbed it quick (I can still hear the snap in my head). It was 7'6" medium heavy and was very versatile for throwing a wide range of types of baits and weights.

Anyways, I need a new casting rod. Looking for another versatile rod because I can only set-up one. I really need to keep it under $200 (the lower the better).

Thanks for any recommendations.

Nick
 

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When I was still guiding I had tried Gloomis St Croix and many others. I ended up replacing all my musky casting rods with Diamondbacks. By far the finest rod out there! When it comes to casting for musky the last thing you want to do is cut corners with the gear that is between you and a trophy fish.

For all around musky casting - MR176M Medium 7'6" 1 $219

http://diamondbackflyrods.cortlandline.com...ault.asp?id=209
 

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QUOTE(muskie_caster @ Jul 20 2009, 02:01 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>When I was still guiding I had tried Gloomis St Croix and many others. I ended up replacing all my musky casting rods with Diamondbacks. By far the finest rod out there! When it comes to casting for musky the last thing you want to do is cut corners with the gear that is between you and a trophy fish.

For all around musky casting - MR176M Medium 7'6" 1 $219

http://diamondbackflyrods.cortlandline.com...ault.asp?id=209
What type of weight range does that rod handle and are there any local dealers?
 

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Go big or go home. I'm a recent convert to conventional gear and I came at it with both barrels. Go heavy, something that will cast 4 oz at a minimum unless you want to cast light bucktails all day long. I've got a St Croiz that will cast 6, on that'll cast 10 and a Musky Innovations that will cast 16 for my Dawgs and Pounders. I like them long too; 8' or better.

If you're going to retool, don't skimp and try to get by with heavy bass tackle. Muskie are muskie and bass are bass.
 

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QUOTE(esoxfly @ Jul 20 2009, 03:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Go big or go home. I'm a recent convert to conventional gear and I came at it with both barrels. Go heavy, something that will cast 4 oz at a minimum unless you want to cast light bucktails all day long. I've got a St Croiz that will cast 6, on that'll cast 10 and a Musky Innovations that will cast 16 for my Dawgs and Pounders. I like them long too; 8' or better.

If you're going to retool, don't skimp and try to get by with heavy bass tackle. Muskie are muskie and bass are bass.

Where did you get the rods at?
I just picked up some dawgs (regular & magnum) and was catching h3ll trying to cast even the regular dawg let alone the magnum.
 

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I get all of my stuff from Thorne Bros or R&H's. But you can the rods at Cabela's I think. Not sure which models they have specifically. But me pesonally, I'd not have a muskie rod rated to less than 6 oz.
 

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I've been looking into picking up a muskie setup as all I have is bass and walleye (I have two complete sets for bass/walleye in 6', 6.5', and 7' in both baitcast and spinner setups, all MH action plus a couple light action for panfish/perch). This time around I'm on a budget and was checking this one out...

http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/stores/s...tems#itemDetail

I'm not thrilled about the 4 bearing system, but the price is right I think to get into muskie fishing, leaving a few dollars free for a few baits. I would love a St Croix or Loomis, but its just not in the budget.
 

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For some reason I never paid attention to the weight rating on rods. I always thought that heavy action meant just that ....OOOPPPSSS!

Now I'm truly understanding what musky rods are all about!
 

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Bass "heavy" and muskie "heavy" are not the same things. Bass heavy is about a muskie medium, if that. They're making muskie XXXH now that will throw 30-40 oz. Like I say, if a DCG is three oz, I want a rod that starts at about 6 and that's as light as I want. Also helps with hooksets.
 

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QUOTE(esoxfly @ Jul 20 2009, 05:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Bass "heavy" and muskie "heavy" are not the same things. Bass heavy is about a muskie medium, if that. They're making muskie XXXH now that will throw 30-40 oz. Like I say, if a DCG is three oz, I want a rod that starts at about 6 and that's as light as I want. Also helps with hooksets.

Starts @ 6
. Geez, I just picked up a 2-9oz'er that feels like a broom stick. I couldn't even imagine one that handles 30 - 40 oz! I figured the 2 - 9 oz'er would handle the bondy's & magnum dawgs pretty good.
Doubling up the lure weight makes sense. I pretty sure it would cut down on soft hook sets and possible rod breakages.
The "heavy action" rod I have now is rated up to 3oz and obviously WAY to soft. It would explain why I've had so many get off too.

Good stuff guys! I R lernin!
 

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QUOTE(Mantas @ Jul 20 2009, 01:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(muskie_caster @ Jul 20 2009, 02:01 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>When I was still guiding I had tried Gloomis St Croix and many others. I ended up replacing all my musky casting rods with Diamondbacks. By far the finest rod out there! When it comes to casting for musky the last thing you want to do is cut corners with the gear that is between you and a trophy fish.

For all around musky casting - MR176M Medium 7'6" 1 $219

http://diamondbackflyrods.cortlandline.com...ault.asp?id=209
What type of weight range does that rod handle and are there any local dealers?


Most of your local shops can order them or the places esox fly listed have them.
 

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Roughly 8ft or longer is definitely preferred for casting distance and hook sets when casting. I'm not a fan of "broom handles," except for slowly trolling huge baits, when it's necessary to get good hook sets, as in late fall.

Some flex in the tip does not preclude casting a big, heavy bait if the rod is designed well, but not enough flex surely precludes casting a smaller bait, and is likely to result in more lost fish by tearing out lightly hooked fish or "losing contact." If the rod is long enough, you should be able to get good hook sets, too.

Judging from the fact I've lost a much, much greater percentage of fish using braided line than mono and on lures with smaller hooks, I think more fish are lost by the hooks tearing out than not being hooked in the first place.

I like my 8'6" Pete Maina rod as an all-purpose rod. I'm expect some of the higher end (St. Croix, Diamondback, Loomis, etc.) models are even better.
 

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Okuma EVX 8'6" heavy 99 dollars one of the best built rods I have used lighter than the st.croix triumph with alot of back bone nice cork handle also longer for more leverage for casting you cant go wrong with this rod. Gander Mountain has them also comes with a rod case.
 

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We'll I've hooked & landed 2 skies on my new rod. Where as I was like 3 for 15 with the other one. At this point I have to say I'm leaning toward the heavier/stiffer rods at this point with an upgrade to 100# braid. For me that seems to have made all the difference in the world. Now when I get a strike I seem to be setting the hook really well. None of them have been lightly hooked unlike my other softer rod. I had the bucktail fall out one of one fish after I netted it. Now I have to grab the pliers and pull out several hooks not just one.

With that said you do have a whole lot more experience with muskies than I do. It might just boil down to a different "style" of setting the hook or something like that.
 

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I agree a longer rod will help, probably should have specified the 6'9" in my previous post. I have that very same rod and Ive been very pleased with it. I also have a 6'6" Falcon Lowrider XG for smallmouth, walleye and ski. St. Croix musky rods start at 6'9" and go up from there (along with the price) So is it fair to say that a 6'9" should be the minimum lenght in a musky rod? Or shall we start at 6'6" ? From my understanding he wanted something that would be a little more universal. lenght of the rod will give you greater casting but not if its paired with an under par reel.
 
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