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Funny, I sent some pics to my brother who was in the Coast Guard & I just heard back from him. He said the new Mackinaw is seriously downsized compared the original one. If that is smaller, I'd like to have seen the original one! My brother was stationed on the USCG Woodbine, a buoy tender.

Great pics Ballzout!
 

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I was curious about the size difference between the 2 so I looked it up. The old Mac was 290 foot, with a 74 foot beam. The new Mac is 240 foot with a 58 foot beam. The old ship is now a museum in Mackinaw City. I DO learn something new every day!
 

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QUOTE(Jazzy @ Feb 24 2010, 12:38 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I was curious about the size difference between the 2 so I looked it up. The old Mac was 290 foot, with a 74 foot beam. The new Mac is 240 foot with a 58 foot beam. The old ship is now a museum in Mackinaw City. I DO learn something new every day!
I might have to check that out next time i am up there. Thanks
 

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QUOTE(Jazzy @ Feb 24 2010, 02:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(islander @ Feb 24 2010, 01:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hope they learned how to drive her better since they crashed into the Grand haven pier on her maiden voyage


That little "mishap" caused Capt Triner to be relieved of his command. Alcohol was a factor.


Wow I had never heard what came of the investigation. Very sad
 

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There was even more to the story when the new Mackinaw tagged the seawall in Grand Haven.

Ludington Daily News, March 11, 2006
Dog, presumed drowned after falling into channel, found alive
Grand Haven, Mich, (AP) ---
A dog that was presumed drowned after falling into a river channel that feeds Lake Michigan and disappearing beneath the icy water was found alive hours later and returned to its grateful owner.
A December accident involving a new Coast Guard icebreaker may have ended up saving the dog's life.
The Grand Haven Department of Public Safety said Robert Chavez, of Ottawa County's Grand Haven Township, was walking two of his dogs alongside the Grand River around 10:30 a.m. Tuesday when one of the animals, a German Shepherd, fell into the channel and broke through the ice.
The icy conditions prevented Chavez from getting the dog out of the water, so he ran to a nearby home and called 911. When he returned to the river, he could not find the dog, the Grand Haven Tribune reported.
Officers from the Public Safety Department and the Coast Guard station in Grand Haven arrived and searched the water and the area. They also could not find the animal, which they presumed had drowned.
Around 9:45 p.m., a woman called the department to report that she and her friends had heard a dog barking as they walked along the channel's south pier, which is maintained by the Army Corps of Engineers.
Responding officers also heard barking. It appeared to be coming from a tunnel beneath the pier, but they were unable to remove a service cover to gain access to the tunnel.
Corps personnel were contacted but said they would not be able to assist until Wednesday morning.
Two hours later, a man called the Public Safety Department to report that he had heard barking sounds coming from below the surface of the pier, so he managed to remove the 12-inch service cover and found a dog trapped in the tunnel.
Ottawa County sheriff's Deputy Mike Petroelje, who has experience handling dogs, was contacted and soon responded to the scene. The Muskegon Chronicle reported that he used a leash to free the dog, which was not injured.
Officials said they believe the German Shepherd gained access to the tunnel by swimming through a hole created in the channel's seawall when it was rammed by the Mackinaw while the new icebreaker was on a tour of Great Lakes ports.
The Mackinaw's captain was removed from his post after the accident, which also left an 8-foot-by-3-foot dent in the bow of the $90 million ship.

Link to March 11, 2006 Ludington Daily News:
http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=110&...;pg=4662,841830

You can see why, from the photos posted from the early 90s, the "old" [read:real] Mackinaw was painted red in her later years of service. She blends right into the ice pack.

Was lucky to see and photograph her in the St. Clair River when she was on her way back to Cheboygan after her final refit in Toledo back in late summer 05. Great ship.

And just for the sake of comparison, USCGC Woodbine was of the same basic 180-foot buoy tender design as USCGC Bramble.
 

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USCGC Mackinaw (WAGB-83) upbound at Port Huron, in St. Clair River, just south of Bluewater Bridges, September 16, 2005. Was a very rainy, misty, sad kind of day.
Photos by me.

View attachment 72614

Portside view of the Mighty Mac.

View attachment 72615

Stern view as she crosses under the bridges and makes the turn for the Lake Huron Cut. Visible just above the prop wash from the two 14-foot diameter propellers, at the very stern of the ship, is Mackinaw's towing notch. The icebreaker would move into position and the bow of a ship beset by ice would fit into that notch. The two ships would be winched together as one unit and Mackinaw would then basically act as a waterborne, 10,000 horsepower diesel-electric locomotive to help pull the other ship through the ice.

Note not only the beam of the ship, but also the top of Fort Gratiot Lighthouse almost directly above her port boat davit.
 

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You should definitely try to tour the "old" Mackinaw if you get up to Mackinaw City. It was $10 for the tour and was well worth it. If only to see how big everything is on that boat. It is docked right next to the brand spankin new Mackinac State Harbor.
 

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QUOTE(Mar-Ann @ Feb 25 2010, 11:54 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>You should definitely try to tour the "old" Mackinaw if you get up to Mackinaw City. It was $10 for the tour and was well worth it. If only to see how big everything is on that boat. It is docked right next to the brand spankin new Mackinac State Harbor.
Gives me an excuse to go up to the top of the mitten.

Though I'll have to wait till May or later. Their web site says they are not open from Oct 11 to May 20.
 

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If only steel could talk...there's a million Coastie and lake sailor memories there.

She looks really good.

I am one that believes that machines can have a soul. While she deserves a pampered retirement, deep down I bet she wishes she was out there in her element, taking on the ice...

Thought it was kind of disrespectful that they would name the new buoy-breaker after her, as I believe -- and I am not alone -- that there is only one Mackinaw.

Thanks for sharing the pic.
 

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I spoke of this in another thread -- which, not surprisingly, has since disappeared -- so I will share it again.

Federal law requires that the government automatically do a historic review of a ship before it is disposed from the fleet, be it Navy, Coast Guard or whatever. Some ships are determined to be "not historic" and are sent off for scrap or other uses in civilian roles or sent overseas for other countries to use. Some are determined historic and are donated for use as museums. The ships around here for example are USCGC Bramble in Port Huron, USCGC Acacia now in Manistee, and of course icebreaker USCGC Mackinaw in Mackinaw City.

Now that disposition locally doesn't always work out, as USCGC Sundew was recently sold in Duluth by the Convention Center up there to a private businessman (with the blessing of the US Govt) because she wasn't bringing in enough money as a museum. Now who knows what will happen to her. I wouldn't be surprised to see the same thing happen with Bramble in Port Huron (which is too bad because she is probably the most historic of all the 180s).

A lot of the other 180s have been sunk as reefs or as gunnery targets for the US Navy, sold commercial, scrapped, or given as gifts to foreign governments.

As they were prepared for retirement and removal from the Coast Guard fleet, Mackinaw and the 180-foot Buoy Tenders had documentation prepared under the Historic American Engineering Record program or HAER.

http://www.nps.gov/hdp/haer/index.htmYou can read about HAER here.

If you really, truly love history and are a "nuts-and-bolts" kind of person, these are an excellent read.

Here are the reports for the Historic American Engineering Record for both Mackinaw and the 180-foot cutters like Bramble, Acacia, etc.

HAER report USCGC Mackinaw (WAGB-83)

http://www.uscg.mil/History/webcutters/NPS_180_HAER_Report.pdf
HAER report 180-foot Buoy Tenders (WLB/WAGL)
 
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