Lake St. Clair Fishing Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
838 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went outside this morning and took a walk down the seawall because the water was crystal clear and took a look in a corner and saw nessy. There were 2 cats down there gaurding eggs and the smaller of the 2 was at least 8-9lbs and the big one was 10lbs minimum. At the other end of the little cut in the other corner there were 2 more, not quite as big but every bit of 6-7lbs. I tried to take a pic but with the glare, I couldnt get a good pic. My question is do the males or the females sit on the eggs? One of them was sitting right on them and the other was just patrolling the area chasing the gills and gobies. I was wondering which would be the male and which the female. Also, If anyone has a kid that wants to catch a big fish, your more than welcome to come and take a crack at the big one patrolling if your in the shores area. I wont mess with them but it would be a thrill to see a kid catch a 10lb cat. There are gills and largemouth everywhere also. Ill be around until about 5 30 if anyone wants to bring a kid bye to catch one of these beasts. I'd like to see it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,782 Posts
I am a high believer that they DO watch their eggs in a highly aggressive manner. I've been bit many times in the hand as I unknowingly came across a cat protecting its 'cave'. I can only guess they are on a nest, as this area will have cats around it from June-July, but after that, I won't see them in this area. I would 'assume' the female would be the one guarding, for some reason. Maybe I'll go look up the answer.

I went 1/3 yesterday on them and my buddy caught a 7lber. Water was perfect for them yesterday on my side. Shrimp bait of choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
838 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
QUOTE(Large Mouth Peks @ Jun 22 2009, 03:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I am a high believer that they DO watch their eggs in a highly aggressive manner. I've been bit many times in the hand as I unknowingly came across a cat protecting its 'cave'. I can only guess they are on a nest, as this area will have cats around it from June-July, but after that, I won't see them in this area. I would 'assume' the female would be the one guarding, for some reason. Maybe I'll go look up the answer.

I went 1/3 yesterday on them and my buddy caught a 7lber. Water was perfect for them yesterday on my side. Shrimp bait of choice.

I've caught some nice cats behind my house at night with the biggest last year caught by my boy at just over 8lbs and the big one thats here now makes that fish look small. It is minimum 10lbs. Im fighting going over there and droppng a wad of crawlers and a treble but I dont want to mess with them too much as there are gobies everywhere waiting for an absence. The big one is the one thats patrolling the area. Id rather see a kid catch it though. It would be easy pickings. This is the 8lber my boy caught last year.
Gesture T-shirt Reptile Tree Shorts
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,782 Posts
That is a nice fish!!!

Here's a lil info I found...but read else-where that sometimes females will guard the nest too..

"Channel catfish spawn in May to early June, when the water temperature ranges from 75 to 85 degrees, with 80 degrees the optimum. The male prepares the nest, which is usually a depression or hole in an undercut bank, or an excavated burrow under logs or rocks. Sometimes channel cats spawn in sunken, hollow logs or abandoned muskrat holes. In clear ponds, spawning channel cats must have semi-darkened shelters, either natural or provided. From reservoirs, channel catfish sometimes move upstream to spawn in tributary rivers. A female channel cat may lay 2,000 to 70,000 eggs per year, depending on her size. After spawning, the males protect the adhesive egg mass and aerate and clean the eggs by fanning their fins. The males also guard the hatched fish for a time. Young channel cats are insect-eaters, feeding on mayfly nymphs, caddis larvae and midge larvae. As they grow, they switch to fish, crayfish and mollusks, but still feed on aquatic insects, and occasionally eat plant matter. Yearling and subadult channel cats are more tolerant of fast water than larger adults. They move out of slow water into the quicker current or swim short distances into tributary streams to feed. Channel cats feed mostly at night, but may forage on the bottom, where it's dim during the day. Channel catfish, especially young fish, have been known to feed on the surface. Like other catfish, at night they depend on their barbels and their sense of taste to find food. Even so, channel cats are believed to be more of a sight-feeder than other catfishes, because of their clear-water habitat."
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top