Lake St. Clair Fishing Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to the Great Lakes area, I have a 19' Bayliner open bow. I have had no problems on the Detroit River or Lake St. Clair, however, some have said that 19' is a little small. I am always seeing smaller boats on the water. Is this a matter of preference, safety, comfort or some lake monster I don't know about? Is there much difference before you get into the larger crusiers, say between a 19' or a 21-22'? Any advice would be greatly welcomed.

Regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,886 Posts
Well Shorthull.
I started with a 19 foot Searay cuddy and I could get around also. Now I have a 225 Crownline Cuddy and I can say that the difference in the 3 1/2 feet is the ride. The boat rides much nicer. You don't get nearly as many hard bumps when it gets rough out there and you can cruise a little faster through the chop. When I had my 19' my cruise speed in rough water was probably 25 mph. Now I can cruise rough water going approx. 40 mph and the ride is still smoother.

The other consideration you need to look at is also the hull deadrise. That makes a difference in how th boat handles waves as well. My SeaRay had a 18 degree deadrise, and my Crownline has a 22 degree deadrise. The bigger deadrise means that the boat cuts through the waves a little bit more than the lower degree deadrise, that will "bob" on top of the waves.

I would definitely have to say that the 225 has made my boating experience far better than I ever had with my Searay and I will also say that Crownline makes a great boat. If you decide to look for bigger, I would suggest you consider the Crownline 225, or one of their other models.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,550 Posts
To add to what Jabber said, make sure that you look at the length of the hull, not the LOA. Your Bayliner probably has a molded-in swim platform, and boat builders now add that into the length that they advertise. Mine is a 223, but it's an older boat ('89). It's got a bolt on platform, and It's LOA is 24ft, hull length is 22' 3". Longer, sharper deadrise boats run better in rough water.

As for the ride, my current ride is much better than the boat I had before, which was 3 ft shorter. It's not so much top end, but you're able to run faster alot easier in all the boat chop on the Lake. And another added benefit is that you usually move up to a V8, and your gotta love having alot more torque to play with.

Get someone to take you out for a ride and decide for yourself!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for the input Jabber and Damn Yank. You have pretty much confirmed my belief that a slightly larger boat would be better for the bigger water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,550 Posts
Shorthull, I think it is called 3ftitis, and can only be cured by buying a bigger boat. You are showing the 1st symptoms...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,174 Posts
When people ask my opinion, I always tell them I would never go smaller the 23 or 24 feet.
Especially if your planning on making runs like Put-in-bay or Rattlins.
Sometimes when I run down to Put-in-bay I feel like my 28 footer is too small.

NoCode
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,709 Posts
QUOTE(damn yankee @ Sep 16 2003, 04:44 PM)Shorthull, I think it is called 3ftitis, and can only be cured by buying a bigger boat. You are showing the 1st symptoms...
Just remeber that "3ftitis" is only a general term and you have no reason to stay within the 3 ft mark.

We went from nothing to a 18' SeaRay Seville Cuddy to a 27'7" SeaRay Sundancer 270 within 5 months. We've had the 270 for a year now and are looking at a 340 0r 360 for next season.

Showing symptoms? I think we have the disease, full blown.

ANyone in the market for a 270?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,184 Posts
Gee Jim, you just got that one set up the way you wanted it. lol.

We actually went smaller. The Wellcraft was 26ft and about 6000lbs. The Maxum is 25 feet and 5000lbs. Same motor and outdrive. Top end on the Wellcraft was 28MPH on a good day. The Maxum was doing 38MPH even at the end of summer when we pulled out due to the head gasket problem.

I figure mid 40's next year on a strong motor. The deadrise on the both is about the same so the ride is very similar. We looked around quite a bit at different boats, for the last several years in fact. We liked some of the Sea Rays. Even liked the looks of the Rinkers with thier prices.

We really liked the layout of the Maxum. It suited us for what we wanted in a boat and of course the price was right. We're considering a trailer now. Might like to pull it up north for a week or so some summer. A trip over to Mackinaw Island or a cruise around Little Bay De Noc.

Good luck with finding something you like. There are a lot of boats for sale right now. You ought to be able to find something that suits you. Dont forget a survey. Protect yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,709 Posts
Spider is SOOOO right. No matter what you deceide on, get a survey done by someone reliable. It costs a little extra, but it can save you a bundle in the long run.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the input. I must have 3ftitis. I had lunch the other day with a gentleman who bought a new boat back in 1962. It was delivered in pieces to his driveway, He bolted it all together and he had a 14ft something or other. I asked him where he used a boat that small, he said all over lake St. Clair and Erie. His kids even skied behind it. He now has a tug, but I guess if your not to proud (me) ,watch the weather and other boaters, you can have a good time on a smaller boat.
 
G

·
If you want to enjoy most of what LSC has to dish out? No shorter than 25'.

If you do a lot of boating.

If you are an occasional boater, than you probably can get by with a small boat. I put over 100 hours this year. And I have been out there with 4 and 5 footers(not fun), but at least you can get where you are going to be safe.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top