Lake St. Clair Fishing Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fortunately I made it back and was on the trailer when that storm hit on Sunday. But if I would have gotten caught out there in it, what would have been the best way to hanlde it? Would you try to anchor to keep the bow into the wind or would you need a sea anchor? I'm asking now in case I ever get stuck in that situation. Knowing what to do could save myself or others reading this post.
Thank you,
Ron Hartman
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,514 Posts
QUOTE(Molly Frair @ Aug 11 2009, 12:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Fortunately I made it back and was on the trailer when that storm hit on Sunday. But if I would have gotten caught out there in it, what would have been the best way to hanlde it? Would you try to anchor to keep the bow into the wind or would you need a sea anchor? I'm asking now in case I ever get stuck in that situation. Knowing what to do could save myself or others reading this post.
Thank you,
Ron Hartman

i was out and got back 20min before the tornado warnings blew
as i have a 16 ft trihull if i would of anchored the waves would of come over top of my bow so i just idled down and hit the waves on an angle remembering what i think exo typed last week not to hit them head on it could dive your boat straight into the water this is not my advice but what i did

Good topic could save a many of us. Plus i would like to take a boaters saftey class if anyone has any info
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,622 Posts
Toss the anchor out the front after tieing to boat and let out all the rope tie to where you connect for trailer. Stay away from Graphite rods. Put them away. This is last resort. Get low and ride it out. Put life jackets on.<----first

h2o
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Never ever ever ever anchor in the middle of the lake during a storm, thats what happened to the football players in the gulf, the anchor on the bow keeps the bow down no matter how long the line is. best to keep motor going and cutting waves on angles, or riding with the waves surfing on them till you can get to a safe place behind an island or in a harbor somewhere, or the storm clears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,874 Posts
Maybe its just me, but I don't think there is ever ANY reason to be caught in a storm like that. You should be seeking shelter or the launch or at the very least fish very close to the shore where its not going to be rough so you can get out quicker.

I was amazed how many people I could see running north and south past my house as that storm was hitting.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,916 Posts
QUOTE(wallysteve @ Aug 11 2009, 12:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>....i think exo typed last week not to hit them head on it could dive your boat straight into the water this is not my advice but what i did

If by exo, you mean me, I did type that last week but that mainly applies to following seas when you ride down the back of a wave and drive yourself into the next one. Oncoming seas, depending on their size and your boat, are sometimes best handled head-on and letting your hull work for you and cut through it. But again, this all depends on size of the seas, your boat, and it's hull design.

QUOTE(AllEyesOnMe @ Aug 11 2009, 01:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Never ever ever ever anchor in the middle of the lake during a storm, thats what happened to the football players in the gulf, the anchor on the bow keeps the bow down no matter how long the line is. best to keep motor going and cutting waves on angles, or riding with the waves surfing on them till you can get to a safe place behind an island or in a harbor somewhere, or the storm clears.

It kinda depends. If you don't have a reason to anchor, it's best to stay underway and you can pick your battles as they come. But if your boat is disabled, or can't see to navigate, I'd not say, "never ever" anchor because then you'll come into the trough and the boat's hull is not designed to take water sideways. The problem is that most people don't anchor properly. I know you said not matter how long the line is, but that's not entirely accurate. If I remember from seamanship class back in boot camp (I'm in aviation, so I'm not 100% up on boats) they taught 5-7 times the depth of water for a proper anchor scope. So if you're in 10' of water here, you really should have 70' or more out for an anchor. With that much line out, your boat will ride the waves and pull line as it needs. The same applies for bouys. Think of your boat as a bouy riding in waves. Bouys have enough chain/line on them to ride the waves not matter how large they are so they don't sumberge or come off station. Bouy's aren't anchored with bungy cords, they're anchored the same way a boat is. Now yes, if you're in a 20' bay boat in 25' seas, and you're anchored, you may take water over the gunwhales and fill the boat.

Ron, for as large as your boat is, point her into the wind and keep a safe heading. That boat would be safe in the middle of Lake Superior. Just remember that if you're in 4' of water, and there's 2' of chop, the troughs of the waves are now 2' above the bottom and water that was safe under flat conditions is now a "reef" you can bottom out on. Just be mindful of that. Alot of guys tend to want to head to shallow water and that's not usually a good thing. Protected water what you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,969 Posts
QUOTE(AllEyesOnMe @ Aug 11 2009, 01:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Never ever ever ever anchor in the middle of the lake during a storm, thats what happened to the football players in the gulf, the anchor on the bow keeps the bow down no matter how long the line is. best to keep motor going and cutting waves on angles, or riding with the waves surfing on them till you can get to a safe place behind an island or in a harbor somewhere, or the storm clears.

Actually that's not what happened with the football players. Their anchor got stuck on the reef so instead of doing the smart thing & cut the rope. They did the dumb thing & tied the anchor line to the stern & put motor in gear to try to free the anchor & they got swamped & the boat capsized.

If you are in a storm out on SC I wouldn't anchor at all. Keep the motor running & position the boat the best you can to take on incoming waves. I wouldn't try going to shore if it's being beaten up by the waves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
First put on your PFD

Handling a Boat in Stormy Seas
1. Maneuver so the boat takes the initial and heaviest winds on the bow, not abeam.
2. Waves should be approached at a 45-degree angle. This will help keep the propeller underwater and reduce pounding.
3. In moderate seas, slow your speed so you can ride atop and over a wave. Avoid driving the bow into a wave or riding to the top of the wave and falling off the back, which could bury the bow.
4. Remember ... the heavier the seas, the slower your boat speed to minimize strain on the vessel and maximize steering control.
5. Continue to keep the bilge free of water to prevent the rolling effects of sloshing water below.
• Anchoring only if you can find a safe place out of the strongest winds.
Anchoring may keep you from running aground in bad weather or as a result of engine failure. Follow these guidelines:
• Make sure you have the proper type of anchor.
• A three to six foot length of galvanized chain should be attached to the anchor. The chain will stand up to the abrasion of sand, rock or mud on the bottom much better than a fiber line.
• A suitable length of nylon anchor line should be attached to the end of the chain (this combination is called the "Rode"). The nylon will stretch under heavy strain cushioning the impact of the waves or wind on the boat and the anchor.
• Determine depth of water.
• Calculate amount of anchor line you will need. General rule: 5 to 7 times as much anchor line as the depth of water plus the distance from the water to where the anchor will attach to the bow. For example, if the water depth is 8 feet and it is 2 feet from the top of the water to your bow cleat, you would multiply 10 feet by 5 to 7 to get the amount of anchor line to put out. Many people do realize how much line they need what works on a calm day will not hold in a storm.
• Do not throw the anchor over, as it will tend to foul the anchor.
• When anchor is firmly set, use reference points (landmarks) in relation to the boat to make sure you are not drifting. Check these points frequently.
• Do not anchor by the Stern!!
Anchoring a small boat by the stern has caused many to capsize and sink. The transom is usually squared off and has less freeboard than the bow. In a current, the force of the water can pull the stern under. The boat is also vulnerable to swamping by wave action. The weight of a motor, fuel tank, or other gear in the stern increases the risk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,622 Posts
And tie the rope to the boat before letting the anchor out. Were talking about LSC. I've been in some nasty storms and putting the anchor out the front worked fine. Problem could be getting the anchor back. Once seas calm using the boat in the opposite direction could free the anchor. Jerk it out by backing up slowly. Of course use common sense and clear thinking in all of this.

h2o
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
I got caught in the wind on sunday in my 19 ft bayliner

WOW What a ride,,,,,,,Thank god a 25ft boat got in front of me

and I rode his wake al the way back to the launch

I need to buy that guy a beer..................BIG TIME

Whoever was on a 25ft larson(i think) heading into beacon cove

Thanks so much......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
I have to agree With Homer, but you still have too watch that you don't get sideways to the waves. You also have to watch your speed at each wave. The best place for you to learn is here http://www.uscgboating.org/safety/courses.htm it could very well save your life as you are obviously a newbie. I have been on this lake for about 50 years and have taken this course three times now because they seem to always have new things such as GPS. IPB, etc. and as a reminder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
QUOTE(Molly Frair @ Aug 11 2009, 12:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Fortunately I made it back and was on the trailer when that storm hit on Sunday. But if I would have gotten caught out there in it, what would have been the best way to hanlde it? Would you try to anchor to keep the bow into the wind or would you need a sea anchor? I'm asking now in case I ever get stuck in that situation. Knowing what to do could save myself or others reading this post.
Thank you,
Ron Hartman
Good topic to bring up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for all the responses. Not exactly a newbie tho. You learn from your mistakes and so far I have not made this one of them. I agree totally with Snowman, you should never get caught in this situation. In 25 years I haven't got caught in one yet. However as they say Chit happens and I wanted to learn what to do the easy way. Although I wasen't in the lake when it hit, I was in the parking lot wondering what I would have done to be safe. Thats why I brought this up, for myself and all the others that haven't experienced it yet. Thanks again for all the information. Hope I won't need it.
Ron...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
QUOTE(chewy62 @ Aug 11 2009, 02:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I got caught in the wind on sunday in my 19 ft bayliner

WOW What a ride,,,,,,,Thank god a 25ft boat got in front of me

and I rode his wake al the way back to the launch

I need to buy that guy a beer..................BIG TIME

Whoever was on a 25ft larson(i think) heading into beacon cove

Thanks so much......

It's nice when you can ride the wake in from a bigger boat like that during a storm, or on a windy day. We got caught about 25 years ago in a storm out there. It kind of did what the earlier storm over the lake at 12 noon today did if anyone saw that rapid development.
The storm that hit us developed right on the North side of Anchor Bay and rolled South.
It was in July and in a matter of minutes the temp went from 92 F and sunny, to 67 F with wind (60 MPH gusts), rain, and hail. The lightning was spooky while sitting in a metal lightning catcher too.
We were coming around the seawall by Beacons cove for cover, and had some dip$h-t cut us off as we were ready to make way around the corner of the seawall. This guy must have been in an all out panick and crying.
He was going balls out at about 30-35 MPH and cut right out in front of the bow of our boat, missing us by about five feet as he pulled into the harbor area and almost sank us with his huge wake. We were working hard keeping a 16' aluminum above the water and dodging waves that were five feet, and sure didn't need that. Winds were whipping at around 30-40 MPH between the harder gusts of 60 MPH in the storm. The thing that was a b--ch is that we were in this little 16', and he was in a 30' with a fully covered cabin? That's why I figured he was a pusscake and must have been crying and wetting himself he was so scared, and in a panick.

What we did was launch at Harley Ensign and headed South towards the spillway. By the time we noticed what was bearing down on us from behind, it was too late to turn and head back. The weather said no storms untill after 8 pm that day, and the guy at the baitshop said the same thing. I remember watching the weather that night and they said it was an unusual situation in the way, and speed, at which it developed, and then moved straight South covering the lake.
I dropped off my brother and our girlfriends (wives now) at the docks at Beacons cove, put on a PFD and tried to make way back up to the Clinton River. Got to Metro and said the heck with it when the bow caught the wind as I came over a four or five foot wave and almost flipped the aluminum kite I was in over backwards. Watched the tackle boxes, clothes, and radio I put at the front of the boat to help keep the bow down while I worked the motor at the back of the boat, go flying back over my head and in to the drink. The boat turned into a Catapult on me in that instant. I managed to spit out a few words of repentance while white knuckling the throttle on my 25 hp outboard. I swear I crushed the handlle I was squeezing so hard. By the time I got to Metro, the cold front was through,(4 hours earlier than was supposed to be) and I had enough. I wussed out, or wisened up, depends who you talk to, and pulled into the Black river at Metro. Fortunately it rained hard enough to wash the piss out of my shorts before I got on land
. Called a friend and got a ride to go get the truck and trailer, and went to pick up the others and then went and got the boat.
Was a good learning experience I guess on how not to be a f up again on the water. I pay close attention now, and if it warrants, bail on the fish!
I would have loved to had time to go have a few words with captain pusscake who almost finished us off. Have to say that Black River never looked so good again as it did that day!

Safe boating all!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,039 Posts
QUOTE(propwash @ Aug 11 2009, 03:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(chewy62 @ Aug 11 2009, 02:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I got caught in the wind on sunday in my 19 ft bayliner

WOW What a ride,,,,,,,Thank god a 25ft boat got in front of me

and I rode his wake al the way back to the launch

I need to buy that guy a beer..................BIG TIME

Whoever was on a 25ft larson(i think) heading into beacon cove

Thanks so much......

It's nice when you can ride the wake in from a bigger boat like that during a storm, or on a windy day. We got caught about 25 years ago in a storm out there. It kind of did what the earlier storm over the lake at 12 noon today did if anyone saw that rapid development.
The storm that hit us developed right on the North side of Anchor Bay and rolled South.
It was in July and in a matter of minutes the temp went from 92 F and sunny, to 67 F with wind (60 MPH gusts), rain, and hail. The lightning was spooky while sitting in a metal lightning catcher too.
We were coming around the seawall by Beacons cove for cover, and had some dip$h-t cut us off as we were ready to make way around the corner of the seawall. This guy must have been in an all out panick and crying.
He was going balls out at about 30-35 MPH and cut right out in front of the bow of our boat, missing us by about five feet as he pulled into the harbor area and almost sank us with his huge wake. We were working hard keeping a 16' aluminum above the water and dodging waves that were five feet, and sure didn't need that. Winds were whipping at around 30-40 MPH between the harder gusts of 60 MPH in the storm. The thing that was a b--ch is that we were in this little 16', and he was in a 30' with a fully covered cabin? That's why I figured he was a pusscake and must have been crying and wetting himself he was so scared, and in a panick.

What we did was launch at Harley Ensign and headed South towards the spillway. By the time we noticed what was bearing down on us from behind, it was too late to turn and head back. The weather said no storms untill after 8 pm that day, and the guy at the baitshop said the same thing. I remember watching the weather that night and they said it was an unusual situation in the way, and speed, at which it developed, and then moved straight South covering the lake.
I dropped off my brother and our girlfriends (wives now) at the docks at Beacons cove, put on a PFD and tried to make way back up to the Clinton River. Got to Metro and said the heck with it when the bow caught the wind as I came over a four or five foot wave and almost flipped the aluminum kite I was in over backwards. Watched the tackle boxes, clothes, and radio I put at the front of the boat to help keep the bow down while I worked the motor at the back of the boat, go flying back over my head and in to the drink. The boat turned into a Catapult on me in that instant. I managed to spit out a few words of repentance while white knuckling the throttle on my 25 hp outboard. I swear I crushed the handlle I was squeezing so hard. By the time I got to Metro, the cold front was through,(4 hours earlier than was supposed to be) and I had enough. I wussed out, or wisened up, depends who you talk to, and pulled into the Black river at Metro. Fortunately it rained hard enough to wash the piss out of my shorts before I got on land
. Called a friend and got a ride to go get the truck and trailer, and went to pick up the others and then went and got the boat.
Was a good learning experience I guess on how not to be a f up again on the water. I pay close attention now, and if it warrants, bail on the fish!
I would have loved to had time to go have a few words with captain pusscake who almost finished us off. Have to say that Black River never looked so good again as it did that day!

Safe boating all!



Good job but why not wait it out @ Beacon?

Speaking of storms looks like a good one moving N. to S. over the big lake now.

Hope all are in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
QUOTE(fitsus @ Aug 11 2009, 03:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(propwash @ Aug 11 2009, 03:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(chewy62 @ Aug 11 2009, 02:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I got caught in the wind on sunday in my 19 ft bayliner

WOW What a ride,,,,,,,Thank god a 25ft boat got in front of me

and I rode his wake al the way back to the launch

I need to buy that guy a beer..................BIG TIME

Whoever was on a 25ft larson(i think) heading into beacon cove

Thanks so much......

It's nice when you can ride the wake in from a bigger boat like that during a storm, or on a windy day. We got caught about 25 years ago in a storm out there. It kind of did what the earlier storm over the lake at 12 noon today did if anyone saw that rapid development.
The storm that hit us developed right on the North side of Anchor Bay and rolled South.
It was in July and in a matter of minutes the temp went from 92 F and sunny, to 67 F with wind (60 MPH gusts), rain, and hail. The lightning was spooky while sitting in a metal lightning catcher too.
We were coming around the seawall by Beacons cove for cover, and had some dip$h-t cut us off as we were ready to make way around the corner of the seawall. This guy must have been in an all out panick and crying.
He was going balls out at about 30-35 MPH and cut right out in front of the bow of our boat, missing us by about five feet as he pulled into the harbor area and almost sank us with his huge wake. We were working hard keeping a 16' aluminum above the water and dodging waves that were five feet, and sure didn't need that. Winds were whipping at around 30-40 MPH between the harder gusts of 60 MPH in the storm. The thing that was a b--ch is that we were in this little 16', and he was in a 30' with a fully covered cabin? That's why I figured he was a pusscake and must have been crying and wetting himself he was so scared, and in a panick.

What we did was launch at Harley Ensign and headed South towards the spillway. By the time we noticed what was bearing down on us from behind, it was too late to turn and head back. The weather said no storms untill after 8 pm that day, and the guy at the baitshop said the same thing. I remember watching the weather that night and they said it was an unusual situation in the way, and speed, at which it developed, and then moved straight South covering the lake.
I dropped off my brother and our girlfriends (wives now) at the docks at Beacons cove, put on a PFD and tried to make way back up to the Clinton River. Got to Metro and said the heck with it when the bow caught the wind as I came over a four or five foot wave and almost flipped the aluminum kite I was in over backwards. Watched the tackle boxes, clothes, and radio I put at the front of the boat to help keep the bow down while I worked the motor at the back of the boat, go flying back over my head and in to the drink. The boat turned into a Catapult on me in that instant. I managed to spit out a few words of repentance while white knuckling the throttle on my 25 hp outboard. I swear I crushed the handlle I was squeezing so hard. By the time I got to Metro, the cold front was through,(4 hours earlier than was supposed to be) and I had enough. I wussed out, or wisened up, depends who you talk to, and pulled into the Black river at Metro. Fortunately it rained hard enough to wash the piss out of my shorts before I got on land
. Called a friend and got a ride to go get the truck and trailer, and went to pick up the others and then went and got the boat.
Was a good learning experience I guess on how not to be a f up again on the water. I pay close attention now, and if it warrants, bail on the fish!
I would have loved to had time to go have a few words with captain pusscake who almost finished us off. Have to say that Black River never looked so good again as it did that day!

Safe boating all!



Good job but why not wait it out @ Beacon?

Speaking of storms looks like a good one moving N. to S. over the big lake now.

Hope all are in.


Unfortunately after the storm came through with the cold front, the winds were a sustained 30 MPH out of the North and more, with no hopes in subsiding for a while. Heading to Metro was rough, but when I rounded the point at Metro, there was no land break slowing the winds down and that's when I got the full fury of the winds that tried to flip the boat. Made a quick turn and headed for the safety of the Black river. Being 19 at the time, I learned a lot that day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
It did get pretty nasty ouy there Sunday. Took apretty good pounding on my 24ft Lund. On the way back in saw someone waving for help,he ran out of gas. Towed him in to the gas dock near my marina about 45 minutes before the storm hit. I hope he made it safe to where he was going.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,653 Posts
i always stay under power and nose to the wind but boat size and style has alot to do with a boats ability to handle big water. but the best bet is get close to shore as you can where the wind is coming from so the waves dont have time to build wich is fairly easy in lsc opposed to great lake fishing where you just have to ride it out. id advise against surfing the waves may be a smoother ride but ive seen 3 boats sunk doing that 2 on lk mich 1 on lk huron, and the boats we seen sunk were bigger then my boat. it may be a smoother ride but if you take a wave over the transom it pushes the back of the boat under water and now your in a boat with no power,flooded, and adrift in big seas. personally ill take the bumpy ride
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top