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The tiger muskie is a STERILE HYBRID cross between the muskellunge and the northern pike. The HYBRID gets its name from its distinct, dark vertical bars, although some large individuals display very little barring. Whereas the HYBRID can occur in the wild where both species coexist, the vast majority of HYBRIDS are produced in the hatchery. The female muskie is usually preferred due to its greater egg production than the female northern pike. However, the northern pike and muskellunge cross is often used when suitable numbers of female muskie are not available.

Since its initial introduction in 1978 the tiger muskie has become an extremely popular sport fish. Their large size, willingness to strike lures, and spectacular fight, as well as their elusive nature, make the tiger muskie and exciting and challenging quarry. Unless the water becomes iced over, they can be caught twelve months out of the year. (check regs.) A tiger muskie will reach the minimum legal size sometime during its fourth or fifth year.(check regs.) and will weigh around 10-12 pounds.

Tiger muskies are ambush predators and prefer large prey such as suckers, fallfish, and large minnows with a cylindrical shape similar to their own. Waiting motionless for prey to swim within range, T. muskie then strike their prey in the BLINK OF AN EYE, sharp teeth preventing its escape before being turned and swallowed head first. Unlike sharks teeth, T. muskie teeth are strictly for holding prey not taking bites. Therefore, they can only eat what they can swallow whole. Because they tend to eat large prey that takes longer to digest, T. muskies don't actively feed as often as other predators, furstrating anglers as they curiously follow lures without striking.

Anglers wishing to try their luck on Tiger muskie should have the right gear for the job. A fairly heavy casting rod capable of handling lures up to three ounces combined with a good reel spooled with 14-20 pound test is preferred. Some type of heavy mono or wire leader is necessary to prevent the line from being cut by sharp teeth. Five to seven inch crankbaits to imitate the preferred suckers and fallfish will tempt T. muskie. Many T. muskies are also caught on flashy bucktail spinners and spinnerbaits; even jigs and topwaters can be productive. Once you have hooked one of these brutes, a pistol grip device with jaws for gripping hooks called a "hookout" is a necessity for keeping your hands away from the muskies teeth while removing the hooks.

h2o<---says BoB every catch the Tiger Muskie?
 

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try Burt Lake in Harrison its loaded with them. Record is a little over 53 pounds so I would say try 20 pound line H2o OK ???
PPS. About 1 in a 1000 Tiger Muskie can spawn and can produce offspring. Not trying to be a SA but thought you might like to know. Bob
 

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Woodland Lk. in Brighton is FULL of Tigers,...atleast it use to be anyway!! I remember fishing a club tournament (Bass) there several years ago (late 80's) and I was throwing a Bagley's baby bass crankbait...I caught 3 Tiger's that day and 2 of them came on 3 consecutive casts!!
They were good one's too.....all 3 were probably 7-8lbs or better,[email protected] 28-30" maybe. Beautifully stripped and fought like pitbulls.....I thought I had a 6lb lrgmth on!!


That's the only lake I've ever caught them in and whenever someone mention's Woodland,..I immediately think of "Tiger Muskies!!"


Cool Fish!!
Mac
 
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