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I live in the Algonac area and have always heard people talking about vertical jigging the North Channel and the St.Clair River... I usually just launch in the bay to do my fishing, but thought I might give vertical jigging a try.... The only thing is I have no clue what I am doing! I always hear how crucial boat control is and being 'vertical' If anyone can give me tips on how to get started I would really apprciate it
 

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DC,

Not sure what kind of boat you are running, but the idea is to point your motor into the current (and possible the wind direction). So either backtroll with your outboard or point the electric in that direction, then adjust your speed so the line stays "vertical", otherwise you end up dragging your jig across the bottom. By keeping vertical, you kind of hop /bounce the jig along the bottom. Depending on the current and wind, you might need 3/8 ounce or more, probably use heavier until you get the hang of it. Also consider using 6# fireline as the diameter is very small and will not cause allot of drag in the water and makes it easier to keep vertical.

Hope this makes some sense.
 

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Also put your finger on your line to detect the slightest bite. As you drop your jig on the downward movement do it slowly and faster on the upwards motion. Stinger hooks are great if your missing fish do to short strikers. The fireline is awesome as there is virtually zero stretch. I like the 4lb.test 1lb. diameter. alot better. Even less drag and fish just don't see that small diameter. Fireline is so under rated. I think the 4lb. test is more like 8lb. I've straighten the hook out on snags with 4lb. Just take your time landing the fish. Good luck hope i helped you.....h2o
 

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Another option is to use a bright flourescent mono (like yellow or solar) as a main line. This allows great line visibility in the greenish water background on most of our local waters.
If you are suffering from line twist, you could tie on a swivel and clear dropper (about 2') to the jig. This combo allows you to see the line but the fish doesn't see it in clear water conditions.
Tim J.
 

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DC,

I have another thought for you on keeping your line as vertical as possibel. Just think about "chasing your line" meaning that if your line is drifting away from vertical, point your electric trolling motor in that direction until you have your line vertical again. I like to use speed to do this as quickly as possible. Don't just give it a little power and wait for your boat to catch up. Power up and get it vertical asap.

You don't have to lift your jig too far either. Just lift it six to 12 inches keeping it close to the bottom which is usually the best strike zone for jigging. Varying jigging tempo can also be helpful. Sometime a quick tempo can be good and sometimes a slow tempo can work. Try holding the jig off bottom every second or third lift too at times. In other words, don't get locked into one presentation until you find one that works. It doesn't hurt to use your imagination on this also. I try to visualize what that jig is doing down there when I do what I do.

Well, I hope this helps along with all the other good info above,

Jim
 
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