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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys

Is there anyone out there has heard of or goes whippin for walleye??? I've done it for three years now and we've always had success. Just wondering if there anyone else who dose this type of fishing.
 

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I've done it twice this year in the St. Clair River. I know that
people have good success in the shipping channels when
they're in too.
 

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Absolutely!! We have been whippin at the mouth of the Black River now for the last 3 years. What a blast! Not to mention it has boated me more walleye than any other technique I have tried.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
it is a blast I just wish I could go out my often. The biggest one I've ever caught was 30" and 8 1/2 pounds. I swear that sucker almost pulled me out of the boat a couple of times. I've never had as much fun fishing as I did that night.
 

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could someone fill me in on that technique, i am not familiar with it. if possible, just let me know the basic setup and techniques
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This is how we whip for walleye. First things first, you will need the right fishing rod. A whippin rod is 1/3 to maybe 1/2 of a regular fishing rod with an eyelet on the tip, it needs to be a good stiff rod otherwise it will not work properly. you will also need a good baitcasting reel. You'll want a baitcasting because of the location of the spool will make it easier for you to let out your line. We use 30 to 50 pound fire line. On the end of your line you going to tie on a three way swivel. On one end of the swivel you are going clip on a two foot leader with a 1 to 2 ounce sinker. On the other end of the swivel clip on a 3 to 4 foor leader, at the end of that leader you clip on a pencil plug and then clip another 3 to 4 foot leader on the tail end of your pencil plug, clip on another pencil plug and than another 3 to 4 foot leader on to the tail end of your second pencil plug and than on the end of that leader clip on your bomber. It takes alittle work not to get you lures all tangled up, I always start with the bomber and work my way up throughing them over board as I go but make sure you hang on to your leader so they don't float away. NOW THIS IS THE FUN PART!!!
when you get all your lures in the water let you line out until you feel bottom, keep your bail open so you can let line out as you work your lures. to give your lures action pull back on the rod keeping your thumb on the spool, as you are working your lures let some line one, maybe a half a spool, keep doing this until you feel a hit ( AND YOU WILL KNOW WHEN THERES A HIT). If at some point you miss a hit retreive you lures about four or five counts then work them back to that spot, sometimes they will hit again. Well that how you do it, if you have a question you can email me at [email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
you know I feel like such a dumby. I forgot to tell you this technique will only work with your boat anchored on a large river such as the St. clair or Detroit rivers, because you need the strong current to pull your lures down river. Also tie your leaders befor you go out and use swivel clips for easier set up. HAVE FUN AND GOOD LUCK!!
 

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I agree mostly with angler_mom, I just have a slightly different technique. One key element is that I never use a snap swivel on the front of the plug, or tie the knot on the front of the plug. I tie the lure so it has a couple inch "loop" of line through the eye of the plug. So basically the plug can move a little more freely. You'd be suprised at the difference it makes at certain times of year. I also run a slightly different set up of plugs. I generally don't use a full two foot leader, I like about a 16-18" one, but that really depends on the spot of river that you fish. I generally only run two plugs, the first one appx. 12 feet or so back from the three way swivel, and the second plug about 4 feet behind that. I have a bunch of these 2 plug set ups completely rigged up and wrapped around pieces of wood (start wrapping by the 3 way swivel, and end with your second plug, then you can simply snap on your 3 way swivel and start unwinding your plugs with your back plug. As for sinker weight, that varies a lot. It can vary from 1 oz to 4 oz, depending on the time of year, and where you're fishing. Use as little sinker as possible, but enough that you can "kind of" hold bottom. In an ideal situation you can slowly move the lure closer and further from your boat as the current changes. The best way to learn is to make friends with a few old river rats and learn from the experts. I've been doing this for as long as I can remember and I learned from a couple guys that knew every contour of the river bottom and every pocket where the current changed. Fishing the St. Clair river is really a science. It's eary to be ok at it, but to really be good it takes a lot of time and experience. Like Angler_mom said make sure you get a good baitcaster or a light trolling reel. You need one with good strong gears because if you're lucky enough to get a 10+ lber it puts a lot of stress on the reel. For a long time I used an old Alvey reel. It was 1:1 so no gears. I caught a few fish around 9-10lbs with that reel. As for a pole. I like to take a pretty stiff bait casting rod and cut it off at about 3 feet. It's not as stiff as most people like, but it allows me to feel bottom a lot better and it's lightly and thus easier on the arm. Basically I use a rod that is as light as possible, but still stiff enough that it doesn't bend at all as I'm pulling the plugs through the water. Like everybody has told you you'll definately know when you have a hit, I was about 8 years old the first time I had one on. I swore it was a snag. The best advice I can give is to learn in person and keep you're eyes open it's a technique that is handed down from generation to generation and everybody has their own little "secrets" that they rarely share. I'll try my best to answer any of your questions as well.
 

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Speaking of all this, has anybody been out in the last week? I'm thinking about going. Anybody have the clarity index for the water south of black river?
 

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In Algonac this tenique is commonly called "still fisning".
Our leads though are usually 15' on the bottom and 7' on the top.
With the strong current of the St. Clair River, you can set your poll in a Salty rod holder, put a clip on bell on the rod tip and wait for the pnone to ring.
(Phone usually rings just when you're using the head)
The set-up is basically the same as deep trolling but with obviously lighter sinker.
I use a chugging sinker. (1.5oz.)
 

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Yeah, there hitting good in Port Huron just after dark. A few of us went out and caught 7 in an hour chugging and another had full drifting. Hot colors seem to be pounded copper with pinkish red beads for drifting and chartreuse/chrome nite stalkers for chugging.
 

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Top of the morning,

The question I have is there one or two of the "river rat" veterans out there willing to take a whipping virgin out and show me the ropes? I've heard they catch alot of fish whipping and always wanted to try, but wasn't confident with dealing with the river.
 

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I really don't have room to take you out on my boat (I have a lot of friends that are always wanting to go and you can really only fish 2 or 3 out of a boat), but if you're ever out there at the same time I'm sure we can figure something out where we anchor next to eath other. I normally launch at the Water Street Launch in Port Huron and fish down by Marysville. I haven't been able to make it out much lately, but normally I go on Saturday nights a little before dark.
 
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