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QUOTE(Away Point @ Feb 2 2010, 08:08 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Here is one!




Didn't want to be the buzzkill in the embarassing boat moment thread so I moved this here.

In reality, whoever posted this to Youtube thinking it might be funny and a docking failure doesn't realize what this is. This is probably shot at Alang Beach in India or somewhere like it in Pakistan or Bangladesh. (Flag in the foreground left at end of clip is Mauritius, but hard to say if that's where this was shot as it could be just a flag lying around in the scrap being used as a target for the wheelsman of the ship. Also note the sound of the equipment/dozer being used to further pull the ship up higher on the beach using its own momentum.)

This is not only a common occurrence, but it is a successful "docking."

Because of environmental issues in the Americas, many ships are sent overseas for scrapping. They have lead and other heavy metals, asbestos, PCBs, etc. on board.

I'll use the Great Lakes as an example since that's where we're at. While International Marine Salvage in Port Colborne on the Welland Canal in Canada scraps to high standards of environmental cleanliness and safety, many ships are sold and resold through international brokers and then towed overseas, sometimes taking months to get to places like Alang. Ships of all types from all over the world end up there.

If they go under their own power, the scrappers wait until high tide and then make a charge with the ship at full speed for the beach with the intent of grounding the ship as high as possible up on the sand. If deadship, they are winched up using dozers or heavy equipment. That's what is in this tape. Look to the left and right and you can see the partially scrapped remains of other ships.

The scrapyard owners have big parties when this happens...lots of money coming in for them.

Once on the beach, hordes of very low-income Indian (or Pakistani, etc.) workers, literally cut the ships apart with hand saws, acetylene torches and other low-tech means. Safety equipment has not been a norm. Traditionally, the mortality and injury rates are extremely high, but the interior of these countries are poor, so men and children come from miles around to work on the beach. (I suspect that, because there was a camera there filming, that the six hard hats they had were out.) People are crushed, burned, or fall through rusty decks. Women and children go through the little metal scraps to find something that can be sold. It is sad and appalling, but a way of life and a way of business.

Many Great Lakes ships have met their end here, like Canadian Venture of Upper Lakes Shipping as a recent example. Also the great ocean liner SS Norway, not too long ago.

This is part of a big environmental argument going on right now, how industrialized nations like the U.S., Canada, and Great Britain, with their environmental laws, can dump their "toxic" ships on third-world countries.

Here is the Greenpeace site for example: http://www.greenpeaceweb.org/shipbreak/tra...eport_alang.asp

The Fifth Estate on CBC did a good expose on this a couple years ago when the Venture and Canadian Trader were getting ready to be towed out of the Seaway to go for scrap.
http://www.cbc.ca/fifth/bigbreak/story.html

National Geographic also produced a video many years ago on Alang.

Here is another video on Youtube I found real quick. It's Bangladesh, but the setup is the same as that of the other shipbreaking beaches:
WARNING: SOME GRAPHIC PICTURES OF INJURY THAT SOME MAY FIND DISTURBING.

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That makes a lot more sense than a failed docking maneuver. Thanks for posting that!

As for the horrible working conditions... Always makes me wonder how bad life must be in places like that, that people actually flock to such horrid working conditions! Count your lucky stars to be living here!!!
 

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The owners and profiters of that ship breaking company are pure evil. And they are probably laughing all the way to the bank and getting plenty of sleep at night.
 

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Aliaga, Turkey has been a hotspot for scrapping of lakers lately. Agawa Canyon, Canadian Prospector, Algoisle all have been towed there and cut up quickly.

Aquarama was also cut up there within the last couple years. There is a photographer named Selim San that takes photos at Aliaga and posts them to places like Boatnerd. (Aquarama was originally a C4-S-B2 ocean ship like the McKee Sons, the barge that ran aground over Christmas. She was converted to be a passenger ship rather than a cargo vessel like the Joseph H. Thompson and McKee Sons. While very 50s and fast, she was hard to handle at slow speeds and had a penchant for ramming docks. She became known as "Aqua-ram-'em" as a result.) Her Captain, Morgan Howell, is legendary on the lakes.

Over the years, Port Maitland and Hamilton, Ontario and Santander, Spain were also the end of the line for many lakers. My uncle's ships were cut up in Bombay and Karachi.

Canadian Leader and what is left of Windoc is currently at Port Colborne at the IMS yard waiting to be scrapped.

Section 56 in Montreal is getting crowded with Canadian ships that are through: Sauniere, Gordon C. Leitch, Algosteel and Halifax are all there waiting to go.
 

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Here's what happened to Windoc that ended her career:

The lift bridge operator at the Allanburg Bridge in the Welland Canal, reportedly loopy on meds and wine he consumed before being unexpectedly called in to work, dropped the bridge on the ship as she passed beneath. Huge legal battle followed and Paterson Steamships Ltd. ended up going out of business.


Part 2

Her stern section was eventually cut off and scrapped at IMS. Then she was moved around a bit...will they make her a barge, build a new stern, cut the stern off another ship and mate it to the forebody? Nope. Back to IMS for scrap.

Incidentally, when a ship runs into another ship or another moving object, that is a collision. When a ship strikes a fixed object, such as Buffalo running into the Detroit River Light, that is an allision.
 
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