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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just getting into whipping .....What brand and #test do you use on your reel and leader? It would seem a non stretch braid would be ideal...correct? Also a good lightweight reel?

Thanks!
 

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Braid is ideal because it doesn't stretch and allows you to feel a lightweight sinker farther back from the boat. I usually use about #30 test on both the main line and leaders, remember that the farther you get back the more abrasions are at risk to your line like rocks and Zebras and such.
 

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QUOTE(craftyfish2 @ Jul 4 2009, 11:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Just getting into whipping .....What brand and #test do you use on your reel and leader? It would seem a non stretch braid would be ideal...correct? Also a good lightweight reel?

Thanks!

Non stretch line is essential, braid works well because of its smaller diameter it is easier to work back.

I feel that a line counter reel is a must. It allows you to identify how far back you are once you catch a fish and then be able to get back to the same spot.
 

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QUOTE(Scubajay @ Jul 4 2009, 09:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(craftyfish2 @ Jul 4 2009, 11:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Just getting into whipping .....What brand and #test do you use on your reel and leader? It would seem a non stretch braid would be ideal...correct? Also a good lightweight reel?

Thanks!

I feel that a line counter reel is a must. It allows you to identify how far back you are once you catch a fish and then be able to get back to the same spot.


I feel that a line counter used strictly for, or relied on for, whipping is nothing more than a waste of extra money spent on a non-needed item. To understand this, you need to understand the night-time feeding habits of Walleye and the purpose of whipping.

First of all Walleye don't stay hidden in holes and under structure protecting their eyes from the sun while waiting for bait to go by or something enticing them to snap at it, like they do during the day. When Walleye feed at night, They become active and leave the holes and structure in search of food such as baitfish. The baitfish are usually found in the shallower water. The walleye will swim up and down the inclines eating bait fish. Walleye don't stay at one spot and just pig out, they grab one or a few and then swim back down into the deeper water only to swim back up to grab some more food.

The purpose of Whipping is to find an incline, anchor at the head of it or in front of it and target the fish who are all ready active and in the feeding mode on that incline. While whipping, you are moving your plugs back along the incline that the active Walleye are traveling up and down searching for food. By using a line counter after catching 1 or a few fish, you concentrate on getting back to that particular spot and pass other active fish that are closer and neglect those that are behind that spot while there may not be another active fish on that location on the incline at that time. By not using a line counter, their is nothing to distract you from those active fish that are not in the "line counter zone" because you give the same concentration to all active fish that you may come accross while fishing a longer area of the slope. The Walleye will tell you where they are at when they hit. You definately don't need a line counter to tell you something when the fish have no problem doing a good job on it all by their own.

BTW, Have you ever watched a guy trying to set the line counter at night while a fish has just hit? It is hysterical and usually ends up with the guy swearing and cussing because the fish got off while he was busy flipping his headlamp on to read the line counter and had put more concentration on reading the line counter than the whole purpose of being out there to keep the fish on the line until you get it into the boat.
 

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The reel should be a good quality reel. You should stay away from lightweights, but you don't need one to bulky either. Just a good level wind baitcaster with the free fall switch should do the trick.I myself, perfer a lighter rod and reel combination. Ambassadors are a good reel for whippin. Penn 209s are also quite commonly used.

Since your reel is constantly in motion, either letting line out or reeling line in, you definately want one with good qaulity and durability.
 

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QUOTE(boomhauer @ Jul 5 2009, 12:42 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(Scubajay @ Jul 4 2009, 09:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(craftyfish2 @ Jul 4 2009, 11:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Just getting into whipping .....What brand and #test do you use on your reel and leader? It would seem a non stretch braid would be ideal...correct? Also a good lightweight reel?

Thanks!

I feel that a line counter reel is a must. It allows you to identify how far back you are once you catch a fish and then be able to get back to the same spot.


I feel that a line counter used strictly for, or relied on for, whipping is nothing more than a waste of extra money spent on a non-needed item. To understand this, you need to understand the night-time feeding habits of Walleye and the purpose of whipping.

First of all Walleye don't stay hidden in holes and under structure protecting their eyes from the sun while waiting for bait to go by or something enticing them to snap at it, like they do during the day. When Walleye feed at night, They become active and leave the holes and structure in search of food such as baitfish. The baitfish are usually found in the shallower water. The walleye will swim up and down the inclines eating bait fish. Walleye don't stay at one spot and just pig out, they grab one or a few and then swim back down into the deeper water only to swim back up to grab some more food.

The purpose of Whipping is to find an incline, anchor at the head of it or in front of it and target the fish who are all ready active and in the feeding mode on that incline. While whipping, you are moving your plugs back along the incline that the active Walleye are traveling up and down searching for food. By using a line counter after catching 1 or a few fish, you concentrate on getting back to that particular spot and pass other active fish that are closer and neglect those that are behind that spot while there may not be another active fish on that location on the incline at that time. By not using a line counter, their is nothing to distract you from those active fish that are not in the "line counter zone" because you give the same concentration to all active fish that you may come accross while fishing a longer area of the slope. The Walleye will tell you where they are at when they hit. You definately don't need a line counter to tell you something when the fish have no problem doing a good job on it all by their own.

BTW, Have you ever watched a guy trying to set the line counter at night while a fish has just hit? It is hysterical and usually ends up with the guy swearing and cussing because the fish got off while he was busy flipping his headlamp on to read the line counter and had put more concentration on reading the line counter than the whole purpose of being out there to keep the fish on the line until you get it into the boat.


Although your dissertation is filled with ichthyological errors, I will not comment that, however; I will say that I disagree with your comments on line counter reels. Personally I have the skills to both read my line counter and reel in a fish without disaster. I believe that a counter reel is a beneficial tool for locating and reconnecting with walleye whilst using the whipping technique.
 

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QUOTE(Scubajay @ Jul 5 2009, 10:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(boomhauer @ Jul 5 2009, 12:42 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(Scubajay @ Jul 4 2009, 09:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(craftyfish2 @ Jul 4 2009, 11:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Just getting into whipping .....What brand and #test do you use on your reel and leader? It would seem a non stretch braid would be ideal...correct? Also a good lightweight reel?

Thanks!

I feel that a line counter reel is a must. It allows you to identify how far back you are once you catch a fish and then be able to get back to the same spot.


I feel that a line counter used strictly for, or relied on for, whipping is nothing more than a waste of extra money spent on a non-needed item. To understand this, you need to understand the night-time feeding habits of Walleye and the purpose of whipping.

First of all Walleye don't stay hidden in holes and under structure protecting their eyes from the sun while waiting for bait to go by or something enticing them to snap at it, like they do during the day. When Walleye feed at night, They become active and leave the holes and structure in search of food such as baitfish. The baitfish are usually found in the shallower water. The walleye will swim up and down the inclines eating bait fish. Walleye don't stay at one spot and just pig out, they grab one or a few and then swim back down into the deeper water only to swim back up to grab some more food.

The purpose of Whipping is to find an incline, anchor at the head of it or in front of it and target the fish who are all ready active and in the feeding mode on that incline. While whipping, you are moving your plugs back along the incline that the active Walleye are traveling up and down searching for food. By using a line counter after catching 1 or a few fish, you concentrate on getting back to that particular spot and pass other active fish that are closer and neglect those that are behind that spot while there may not be another active fish on that location on the incline at that time. By not using a line counter, their is nothing to distract you from those active fish that are not in the "line counter zone" because you give the same concentration to all active fish that you may come accross while fishing a longer area of the slope. The Walleye will tell you where they are at when they hit. You definately don't need a line counter to tell you something when the fish have no problem doing a good job on it all by their own.

BTW, Have you ever watched a guy trying to set the line counter at night while a fish has just hit? It is hysterical and usually ends up with the guy swearing and cussing because the fish got off while he was busy flipping his headlamp on to read the line counter and had put more concentration on reading the line counter than the whole purpose of being out there to keep the fish on the line until you get it into the boat.


Although your dissertation is filled with ichthyological errors, I will not comment that, however; I will say that I disagree with your comments on line counter reels. Personally I have the skills to both read my line counter and reel in a fish without disaster. I believe that a counter reel is a beneficial tool for locating and reconnecting with walleye whilst using the whipping technique.


I still think that the feel of the walleye whacking your plug is the easiest and the best indication that there is a fish on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks boomhauer and scubajay for your comments, preferences and advice. I'm anxious to get started.
I have a Penn 9M which I'll be using.
 

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QUOTE(Scubajay @ Jul 5 2009, 10:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(boomhauer @ Jul 5 2009, 12:42 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(Scubajay @ Jul 4 2009, 09:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>QUOTE(craftyfish2 @ Jul 4 2009, 11:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Just getting into whipping .....What brand and #test do you use on your reel and leader? It would seem a non stretch braid would be ideal...correct? Also a good lightweight reel?

Thanks!

I feel that a line counter reel is a must. It allows you to identify how far back you are once you catch a fish and then be able to get back to the same spot.


I feel that a line counter used strictly for, or relied on for, whipping is nothing more than a waste of extra money spent on a non-needed item. To understand this, you need to understand the night-time feeding habits of Walleye and the purpose of whipping.

First of all Walleye don't stay hidden in holes and under structure protecting their eyes from the sun while waiting for bait to go by or something enticing them to snap at it, like they do during the day. When Walleye feed at night, They become active and leave the holes and structure in search of food such as baitfish. The baitfish are usually found in the shallower water. The walleye will swim up and down the inclines eating bait fish. Walleye don't stay at one spot and just pig out, they grab one or a few and then swim back down into the deeper water only to swim back up to grab some more food.

The purpose of Whipping is to find an incline, anchor at the head of it or in front of it and target the fish who are all ready active and in the feeding mode on that incline. While whipping, you are moving your plugs back along the incline that the active Walleye are traveling up and down searching for food. By using a line counter after catching 1 or a few fish, you concentrate on getting back to that particular spot and pass other active fish that are closer and neglect those that are behind that spot while there may not be another active fish on that location on the incline at that time. By not using a line counter, their is nothing to distract you from those active fish that are not in the "line counter zone" because you give the same concentration to all active fish that you may come accross while fishing a longer area of the slope. The Walleye will tell you where they are at when they hit. You definately don't need a line counter to tell you something when the fish have no problem doing a good job on it all by their own.

BTW, Have you ever watched a guy trying to set the line counter at night while a fish has just hit? It is hysterical and usually ends up with the guy swearing and cussing because the fish got off while he was busy flipping his headlamp on to read the line counter and had put more concentration on reading the line counter than the whole purpose of being out there to keep the fish on the line until you get it into the boat.


Although your dissertation is filled with ichthyological errors, I will not comment that, however; I will say that I disagree with your comments on line counter reels. Personally I have the skills to both read my line counter and reel in a fish without disaster. I believe that a counter reel is a beneficial tool for locating and reconnecting with walleye whilst using the whipping technique.


If you believe that a reel with a line counter is that beneficial to locating and reconnecting with the Walleye while whipping, Wouldn't it be also beneficial and popular to mark your fist fish wth your line counter and then pull your anchor and drift back the same amount of feet according to your line counter, drop anchor at that same distant and just drop your baits right on top of them and limit out very quickly because your not dragging that fish a couple hundred feet or more against the current if you strongly believe the walleye are in the same location when they feed at night? I haven't seen anyone use that technique before, have you?

On the other hand, I've had fish hit anywhere from just behind the boat as soon as the sinker hit bottom, and in difference locations per each fish all the way back to almost 400', and the Walleye let me know exactly where they were every single time.
 

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I am by no means a pro but most of the walleye I have caught whipping are on the stroke when the line is going back to its original position, so its very important to keep a light pressure on the line, not just let it go.
 
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