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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thinking ahead here since we're floating on dryland at the moment....
We've been boating with baby boats (18-20 footers) for years -- like 15

Obviously, handling a twin engine 30 footer is going to be a bit of an adjustment. What's the best way to avoid the g--dammits and keep other people from jumping overboard when they see us coming?
 

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i had a friend of mine come over and show me a few tips. then i practiced when no one was looking he he he . when you get your new ride go out on the lake during the week when it is not so busy. I practiced docking and slow speed handeling in the middle of the lake. Still had a few s**** when backing down in my slip. good luck I am sure some of the peeps on the board would love to help. I would but Im a newbee to the bigger boats too.
 

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Aside from the, have you taken a boating course? When you get your bigger boat see if someone with experience will go out with you or before you buy go out with someone and have them show you the basics of handleing a twin. Things to remember, big boat=big sail area (wind will push you around),use the tranny for docking you won't deal with the rudders much leave them alone, and go out in the lake use a boat cushon/or life jacket and practice with it anchored and free floating to pull up to it and retreive it (if its anchored don't run over the line). I guess the biggies are go out with some one that KNOWS what they are doing and practice. Oh and while your doing it don't make it "work" relax and have fun thats what its all about


Have you narrowed your seach down yet?? confusing aint it


Cheers
Tony
 

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QUOTE(super7 @ Jun 25 2003, 12:42 PM)Aside from the, have you taken a boating course? When you get your bigger boat see if someone with experience will go out with you or before you buy go out with someone and have them show you the basics of handleing a twin. Things to remember, big boat=big sail area (wind will push you around),use the tranny for docking you won't deal with the rudders much leave them alone, and go out in the lake use a boat cushon/or life jacket and practice with it anchored and free floating to pull up to it and retreive it (if its anchored don't run over the line). I guess the biggies are go out with some one that KNOWS what they are doing and practice. Oh and while your doing it don't make it "work" relax and have fun thats what its all about


Have you narrowed your seach down yet?? confusing aint it


Cheers
Tony
I just took someone out on the lake yesterday morning to help them learn their new boat. He didn't have a clue when we started and now...well lets just say he knows a little more then he did! But practice, practice, practice, is all it will take!
Good luck!
 

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Although I don't have a bigger boat (ours is 24ft) My Dad gave me the best advice regarding docking (though I like DockRocker's advice too!). He told me to SLOW DOWN! Approach the dock SLOWLY. You're not in a hurry, you're on a boat. Why such a hurry to get off the boat? If you have to back down cause the wind is pushing you into something, do it, swing around and try it again.

I wish I would have done a bit more training, I still suck at docking. Although I have to commend Emerald City Harbor. We bought our boat from them and the Salesman included a few hours of "practice" with a liscenced captain! (for a 24ft!!!) The guy took the boat out, handed over control to me and had me do all sorts of things to get better acquainted with it. Then he had me docking in and out of slips at Jeff Beach for an hour or so. HUGE help!

Anyways, the best way is ask the dealer you buy from, or get a buddy who knows his stuff.

Just don't ask me; unless you don't value that new boat!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE(super7 @ Jun 25 2003, 12:42 PM)Oh and while your doing it don't make it "work" relax and have fun thats what its all about


Have you narrowed your seach down yet?? confusing aint it


Cheers
Tony
That's my kind of philosophy. I'm all about the fun, baby


We've narrowed it down to around 30', mid 1990's at least a 10' beam... most likely will be a Sundancer, but we don't want to limit ourselves too much if something that suits us better comes up... One thing I learned from y'all is there is a lot to take into consideration.

Too bad Tiara's are so pricey. I'm ga ga for the 3100 Open.
 

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Tired -

We moved from a sailboat to a 34 ft Sea Ray. Twins are really easier than a single. The peeps havit it right - GO SLOW!! Understand what effect the wind has on your boat (for example, the nose of my boat is light compared to the stern, so the wind pushes it much easier) and don't be ashamed to have to try again - Its built in practice!! We went to Metro Beach ALOT last year and practiced docking bow-in, stern-in and beam-to. Metro offers a lot of different options. Some mentioned a captain - great idea! We were given two hours of instruction when we bought the boat from Colony, but the guy freelances too. He never yelled, intervened only when I was in a really bad spot (sideways in a 15 ft slip!!) and was really patient. Good Luck!!
 

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Just keep these words in mind: NEUTRAL IS YOUR FRIEND

My advice with twins, pull to the dock as lined up as possible, and put it in neutral, with the wheel straight, then dont turn it, and coast in. If needed, do all of your adjustment with forward or reverse, and dont touch the throttle, just use forward and reverse to move the boat where you want it, a little practice and you'll see twins are way easier to control than a single. Just small bursts of "in gear" time, coasting in neutral, put it in gear for 3 seconds to keep it going forward, back to neutral, and so on.

If I gotta drive a single, you're gonna see me on here posting on how to dock a single engine boat.
 

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QUOTE(Campari @ Jun 25 2003, 02:40 PM)...I still suck at docking....
I thought your docking is just fine....It's Mrs.Campari that need the practice....


JK!
 

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QUOTE(Advantage_Rob @ Jun 25 2003, 03:50 PM)Just keep these words in mind: NEUTRAL IS YOUR FRIEND

My advice with twins, pull to the dock as lined up as possible, and put it in neutral, with the wheel straight, then dont turn it, and coast in. If needed, do all of your adjustment with forward or reverse, and dont touch the throttle, just use forward and reverse to move the boat where you want it, a little practice and you'll see twins are way easier to control than a single. Just small bursts of "in gear" time, coasting in neutral, put it in gear for 3 seconds to keep it going forward, back to neutral, and so on.

If I gotta drive a single, you're gonna see me on here posting on how to dock a single engine boat.
Good advice Rob and I agree about a single. I think I would have a helluva time trying to dock a single after having twins for so long.
 

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Like Rob said, don't touch the wheel or the throttle. Use forward, neutral and reverse to steer yourself to the dock or slip.

I've heard (but haven't tried it yet) that you should imagine you have your hands on someone's shoulders (standing behind them) and you're "steering them" by moving their shoulders. Same thing works with the boat.
 

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Everybody is right on the money, in my opinion.

I can only add that it's always easier to push against the force of wind or current. Don't try to turn in with the wind or current - you'll be working with a force beyond your control. For instance, turn into the docks at Deckers from downstream to avoid the current pushing your stern beyond the slip you're shooting for.

Twins of any kind are a snap to work with - just take it easy. Fifteen years with a smaller boat should have given you all the experience you really need, except for some practice with the bigger boat, of course. But you already know 90% of what every boater needs to know.

Have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
QUOTE(Advantage_Rob @ Jun 25 2003, 03:50 PM)Just keep these words in mind: NEUTRAL IS YOUR FRIEND
Funny, with the i/o and the boat lift, neutral felt more like the enemy. This will be a switch.

Now, if the boat fairy would just grant my wish, we'd be out there right now
 
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